Motor Oil Awareness

CONSUMER ALERT

BILL SCHUETTE
ATTORNEY GENERAL

The Attorney General provides Consumer Alerts to inform the public of unfair, misleading, or deceptive business practices, and to provide information and guidance on other issues of concern. Consumer Alerts are not legal advice, legal authority, or a binding legal opinion from the Department of Attorney General.

Motor Oil Awareness

Protect your vehicle!

Do you know what’s being put into your vehicle’s engine, or ever wonder what goes on in the pit or under the hood of your vehicle while at the shop? Whether it’s a routine oil change, or off-the-shelf sales for do-it-yourselfers, the very nature of motor oil invites the opportunity for sale of substandard products through deception and false branding. Motor oil is a critical component of every vehicle’s engine. To help improve fuel economy and protect your engine from wear and damage over the life of the vehicle, vehicle manufacturers recommend that motor oil of specific viscosity grades and service classification be used. These can be found in the vehicle owner’s manual.  The Michigan Departments of Agriculture and Rural Development and Attorney General offer the following motor oil awareness and purchase tips.

Risks Consumers Should Be Aware Of

  • Labeling - Avoid buying off-the-shelf motor oil that does not display the following:
    • The name and address of the manufacturer, packer, or distributor.
    • The viscosity grade classification of the oil, preceded by the letters “SAE”. And before buying, first check your owner’s manual so you know the proper viscosity grade classification for your vehicle to look for on the label.
    • Though not required, many motor oil labels will display the American Petroleum Institute’s (API) Service Symbol “Donut” and Certification Mark “Starburst” shown below; labeling marks often recommended by vehicle manufacturers. For more information, see the API Service Symbol section of this Alert.
  •  Appearance
    • New motor oil should be clear (see through) and not cloudy.
    • New motor oil should be free flowing.
    • New motor oil should not have any sediment.
  • Cost
    • If an oil change costs substantially less than most other competitors, there is usually a reason.
  •  Oil Change Facilities
    • The brand advertised on the sign or marquee may not be the oil being used.
    • Confirm the brand of oil and the number of quarts included in the cost of your oil change. If a shop charges different prices for oil changes, the low price displayed on the sign or marquee may include fewer quarts than your vehicle requires or a lower cost brand of oil than the one advertised.
    • Specifically ask the facility what brand of oil they use and have them record that on your receipt.
    • After getting your oil changed, double check the oil level when you return home.

How to Read a Motor Oil Container’s Label

  • SAE –The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) is the group that assigns the designations on the labels signifying that the oil meets accepted standards. 
  • Viscosity – The SAE viscosity grade defines a numerical system for grading motor oils according to viscosity, or thickness. An example of an SAE viscosity grade classification is SAE 10W-30. Vehicle viscosity grade requirements may vary and you should follow your vehicle manufacturer’s recommendation.
  • API Service Symbol –The American Petroleum Institute Service Symbol "Donut" (see Figure 1) is divided into three parts:
    • The top half identifies the oil's API service classification, a two-letter code starting with either an “S” for gasoline engines or a “C” for diesel engines. The second letter in the API service classification is very important, as it refers to the model years the engine oil was formulated to serve. SN is the API’s current classification level. A label with a service classification such as SA, SB, and SC reflects obsolete, potentially engine-damaging motor oil. (See Figure 2 for API Service Classification recommendations based on your automobile’s model year).
    • The center identifies the oil's viscosity.
    • The bottom half tells whether the oil has demonstrated energy-conserving properties in a standard test in comparison to a reference oil.

Figure 1

The API Donut. Look for the two letter (SN) code on the

 

 Figure 2 

 Figure 2 - API Service Classification for Passenger Car Engine Oil
*Image used with permission from the Petroleum Quality institute of America, LLC

  • API Certification Mark - The American Petroleum Institute Certification Mark "Starburst" (see Figure 3) is designed to identify engine oils recommended for a specific application (such as gasoline service).
    • An oil may be licensed to display the Starburst only if the oil satisfies the most current requirements of the International Lubricant Standardization and Approval Committee minimum performance standard.
    • Many automobile manufacturers recommend oils that carry the API Certification Mark.       

Figure 3
 

 Figure 3 - Petroleum Quality institute of America, LLC seal

Complaints

Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development

If you feel you have not received the correct amount of oil in a container, or the content of a package is not what is claimed on the label, contact the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development consumer complaint hotline: 800-632-3835.

Attorney General

Consumers may also contact the Michigan Department of Attorney General's Consumer Protection Division to file a complaint:

Consumer Protection Division
P.O. Box 30213
Lansing, MI 48909
517-373-1140
Fax: 517-241-3771
Toll free: 877-765-8388
Online complaint form