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Great Lakes Map

Great Lakes Map

To remember the Great Lakes names, remember the word "HOMES."

H=Huron
O=Ontario
M=Michigan
E=Erie
S=Superior

The Great Lakes contain the largest supply of fresh water on earth; 20% of the earth's total fresh water; 9,402 miles of shoreline;  and 94,710 total square miles of surface area (about the size of Texas).  The Great Lakes basin is a 295,200 square mile area within which all surface area drains into the Great Lakes.  It includes parts of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Ontario and Quebec.


Lake Superior

Great Lakes - Lake Superior highlighted

"Uppermost Lake" (French); Kitchi-gummi, a Chippewa Indian translation, signifies "Great Water," or "Great Lake."  A Jesuit name, "Lac Tracy," was never officially adopted.

Superior is the largest of the Great Lakes by surface area and volume, and rich in natural resources.

 

Surface Area:  31,700 mi2 / 82,100 km2 Volume:  2,934 mi3 / 12,230 km3

Length:  350 mi / 563 km

Depth:  489 ft / 149 m average; 1,335 ft / 407 m maximum

Shoreline Length:  2,726 miles / 4,385 km (including islands)

Elevation:  600 ft / 183 m

Outlet:  St. Marys River to Lake Huron

Retention/Replacement Time:  191 years

 


Lake Michigan

Great Lakes - Lake Michigan highlighted

Champlain called it the Grand Lac.  It was later named "Lake of the Stinking Water" or "Lake of the Puants," after the people of other nations who occupied its shores.  In 1679, the lake became known as Lac des Illinois, because it gave access to the country of the Indians of that name.  Allouez called it Lac St. Joseph, by which name it was often designated by early writers.  Others called it Lac Dauphine.  Through the further explorations of Jolliet and Marquette, it received its final name of Michigan, Algonquian for "Great Water."

Michigan is the third largest Great Lake (although Lake Huron-Michigan, at 45,300 mi2 / 117,400 km2 is technically the world's largest freshwater lake.  This is because what have traditionally been called Lake Huron and Lake Michigan are really giant lobes of a single lake connected by the five mile wide Strait of Mackinac.)

 

Surface Area:  22,278 mi2 / 57,750 km2                                                           

Volume:  1,180 mi3 / 4,920 km3

Length:  307 mi / 494 km

Depth:  279 ft / 85 m average; 925 ft / 282 m maximum

Shoreline Length:  1,659 miles / 2,670 km (including islands)

Elevation:  581 ft / 177 m

Outlet:  Straits of Mackinac to Lake Huron

Retention/Replacement Time:  99 years


Lake Huron

Great Lakes - Lake Huron highlighted

Since its French discoverers knew nothing as yet of the other lakes, they called it La Mer Douce, the sweet or fresh-water sea.  A Sanson map in 1656 refers to it as Karegnondi.

Huron is the second largest Great Lake (although Lake Huron-Michigan, at 45,300 mi2 / 117,400 km2 is technically the world's largest freshwater lake.  This is because what have traditionally been called Lake Huron and Lake Michigan are really giant lobes of a single lake connected by the five mile wide Strait of Mackinac.) It has the longest shoreline of the Great Lakes, counting its 30,000 islands.

 

Surface Area:  22,973 mi2 / 59,500 km2

Volume:  850 mi3 / 3,540 km3

Length:  206 mi / 331 km

Depth:  194 ft / 59 m average; 748 ft / 229 m maximum

Shoreline Length:  3,827 miles / 6,157 km (including islands)

Elevation:  581 ft / 177 m

Outlet:  St. Clair River to Lake Erie

Retention/Replacement Time:  22 years

More about Lake Huron


Lake Erie

Great Lakes - Lake Erie highlighted

The greater part of its southern shore was at one time occupied by the Eries, a tribe of Indians from which the lake derived its name.  This name is always mentioned by the early French writers as meaning "cat"; Lac du Chat means "Lake of the Cat."  Many attribute this reference to the wild cat or panther.

Lake Erie is the fourth largest Great Lake and is the shallowest and warmest.

 

Surface Area:  9,906 mi2 / 25,657 km2

Volume:  116 mi3 / 483 km3

Length:  210 mi / 338 km

Depth:  62 ft / 19 m average; 210 ft / 64 m maximum

Shoreline Length:  871 miles / 1,400 km (including islands)

Elevation:  571 ft / 174 m

Outlet:  Niagara River and Welland Canal

Retention/Replacement Time:  2.6 years (shortest of the Great Lakes)


Lake Ontario

Great Lakes - Lake Ontario highlighted

Champlain first called it Lake St. Louis in 1632.  On a Sanson map in 1656, it remained Lac de St. Louis.  In 1660, Creuxius gave it the name Lacus Ontarius.  Ontara in Iroquois means "lake," and Ontario, "beautiful lake."

Ontario is the smallest in surface area of the Great Lakes.

 

Surface Area:  7,340 mi2 / 18,960 km2

Volume:  393 mi3 / 1,640 km3

Length:  193 mi / 311 km

Depth:  282 ft / 86 m average; 804 ft / 245 m maximum

Shoreline Length:  726 miles / 1,168 km (including islands)

Elevation:  246 ft / 75 m

Outlet:  St. Lawrence River to the Atlantic Ocean

Retention/Replacement Time:  6 years

Related Content
 •  Contact Information for Great Lakes
 •  Aquatic Nuisance Control Inland Lakes and Streams
 •  Statutes, Agreements and Treaties
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