Michigan Model for Health:

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ): The Michigan Model for HealthTM

The intent of the FAQ is to introduce you to this strategy and serve as a starting point for further investigation. 

Overview

Implementation

Research

Resources

 

Overview

 

What is the Michigan Model for HealthTM?

The Michigan Model for HealthTM is a nationally acclaimed sequential K-12 health curriculum that has provided comprehensive school health education for school-aged children since 1984.

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What needs can the Michigan Model for HealthTM address?

The Michigan Model for HealthTM addresses the common, but serious health challenges students face, including social and emotional health; nutrition and physical activity; alcohol, tobacco and other drugs; and safety. This curriculum facilitates skills-based learning through lessons that include a variety of teaching and learning techniques, skill development and practice, and helps build positive lifestyle behaviors in students.

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What are the goals and primary student outcomes of the Michigan Model for HealthTM?

The major goal of this program is to motivate and assist students to maintain and/or improve their health, prevent disease, and reduce health-related risk behaviors while creating a partnership between home, school, community groups, and government.

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Implementation

 

What are my first steps for implementation?

The curriculum is designed for teachers (any teacher at the elementary level, and health teachers at the secondary level) to implement in their classrooms. The first step is for a teacher to attend a regional training where she/he would receive the required curriculum materials for implementation. Following this training, the teacher would receive ongoing technical support from his/her ISD Regional School Health Coordinator.

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What structures need to be in place for a successful implementation?

All teachers interested in implementing the Michigan Model for HealthTM lessons need to be available to attend the training with a Regional School Health Coordinator. It is not designed to have teachers train other teachers in their school buildings or districts.

District administrators need to support teachers attending the professional development sessions in order to ensure consistent implementation of the curriculum. A commitment to provide the Michigan Model lessons with fidelity and in conjunction with or as the school's already approved health education curriculum is important for successful outcomes and implementation.

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What should I keep an eye on to help ensure an effective implementation?

  • Teacher availability for Michigan Model for HealthTM trainings and related professional development opportunities
  • Implementation of the curriculum with fidelity to ensure effectiveness

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How do I help my staff implement the Michigan Model for HealthTM effectively?

Administrators can:

  1. Allow teachers to attend Michigan Model for HealthTM trainings and related professional development opportunities. This will help teachers gain knowledge and skills that may assist them in meeting other core standards.
  2. Encourage that the lessons be taught with fidelity in order to obtain similar results as those found in the Michigan Model for Health Grades 4-5 Evaluation.
  3. Gather feedback from teachers who are implementing the curriculum and share that feedback with non-implementing teachers.
  4. Integrate the Michigan Model for HealthTM and Coordinated School Health activities into the School Health Improvement Plan.

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Research

 

What does research say about the Michigan Model for HealthTM?

Over the past 15 years, several randomized control studies have shown the effectiveness of the Michigan Model for HealthTM, including declining numbers in alcohol and other drug use, unhealthy eating, and other risky behaviors by those who received the curriculum. In addition, students improved their skills for managing feelings such as anger and stress, enhanced their skills for staying safe on the Internet, and increased both their knowledge and skills related to physical activity and nutrition.

For more detailed information on the evaluation studies, please visit the following link: www.Michigan.gov/MMH

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What is an example of an effective implementation?

The Michigan and Indiana schools that participated in the Effectiveness of the Michigan Model for HealthTM: A Randomized Control Study (grades 4-5) are examples of effective implementation.

During the study (2006-2008), the schools randomly selected to implement the curriculum did so with fidelity. That is, they taught the lessons sequentially and in their entirety. The results showed that students who received the lessons versus those who did not had:

  • Better interpersonal communication skills
  • Stronger social/emotional skills
  • Less reported aggression in the past 30 days
  • Improved safety skills
  • Stronger drug refusal skills
  • Less reported alcohol and tobacco use in the past 30 days

Note: this is not an exhaustive list of the findings. Additional information upon request.

If a curriculum is not taught with fidelity (e.g., only certain topics, partial lessons, etc.), students may increase their knowledge and their attitudes may improve. However, it is unlikely that their behavior skills will improve in a significant way.

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Resources

 

Where can I learn more?

For more information regarding the Michigan Model for HealthTM curriculum visit: www.Michigan.gov/MMH

Contact Jessica Shaffer (ShafferJ3@michigan.gov) at the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services for more information.

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