National Core Indicators

National Core Indicators (NCI), started in 1997 as a way to track and measure key life indicators: employment, rights, service planning, community inclusion, choice, and health and safety outcomes for people the intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) served by the public mental health system. Michigan started a NCI Advisory Group, which the Council was a part of, called the Developmental Disabilities Practice Improvement Team and the Quality Improvement Council. This group formed to analyze Michigan data and to make recommendations.

In January 2013, Michigan began to measure these life areas: Person-Centered Planning, Health, Living Arrangements, Relationships, and Employment of people with I/DD. These indicators summarize the surveyed results from personal interviews with people with I/DD and the background information provided by the community mental health system. Information from these interviews are used to understand the experience and outcomes of people with I/DD. It is also used to identify areas for continued improvement in the delivery of public mental health services.


The Five Briefs are listed below:

A Guide to Person-Centered Planning: This brief includes a summary of the evolution of the person centered planning process, expectations for service providers to use the person centered planning process, the basic tenets and values of the practice, and the current status of the use of person centered planning in the public mental health system in Michigan. The workgroup identified, and the report includes, a list of the barriers and difficulties to improving outcomes through use of the person centered planning process as well as recommendations for improving this process.

A Healthier You: This brief includes a summary of the data on health status, including overall health status, access to primary care doctors, prevention and screening, physical activity, medications for mood, anxiety, behavior, or psychosis, and obesity status. The workgroup identified, and the report includes, a list of the barriers and difficulties to improving outcomes related to health. The issue of health has received considerable attention at the state and federal level. Michigan’s “Health and Wellness 4 x 4 Plan” encourages all Michiganders to practice four key health behaviors:

1. Maintain a Health diet

2. Engage in regular exercise

3. Get an annual physical examination

4. Avoid all tobacco use

My Home: The brief summarizes the data on residential status, preferences and service statistics of individuals surveyed and served by the public mental health system. The work group identified, and the report includes, a list of the barriers and difficulties to improving reported experiences and choices for community living arrangements. Recommendations for activities to support community living as independently as possible are targeted at multiple stakeholder groups. Change requires local analysis, targeting relevant barriers and acting on the best information. Success occurs when the community mental health system works with multiple engaged stakeholders and the broader community.

The Importance of Relationships: Isolation, and subsequent loneliness, can be one of the most challenging aspects of providing service and supports for individuals with I/DD. This brief addresses the experience of loneliness by individuals with I/DD and explores opportunities to support individuals to develop and nourish relationships, friendships and community/social connections.

Wanting to Work: The analysis and recommendations provided in this brief support existing efforts and offer ideas for improvements that will increase the rate of employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), consistent with their abilities and choices. Employment/earning income is an expected part of the person centered planning process for individuals with I/DD as noted in the BHDDA Employment Works! Policy.

 


2014-2015 Adult Consumer and Family & Guardian Surveys by Region