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Address Confidentiality

Address Confidentiality Program Act

In December 2020, Governor Whitmer signed the Address Confidentiality Program Act, 301 of 2020. The Address Confidentiality Program (ACP) was created to provide certain protections for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, human trafficking, or those who fear that disclosure of their physical address will increase the risk of harm.

ACP is a statewide confidentiality program administered by the Michigan Department of Attorney General.  ACP operates to shield a program participant’s actual physical address by providing an official designated/substitute address and free mail forwarding service.

The program will be available to the public in the 1st quarter of 2023. 

Address Confidentiality Program Logo

What is the Address Confidentiality Program (ACP)?

The Program (ACP) was created to conceal the addresses of victims of stalking, domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, and of individuals at risk of being threatened or physically harmed from being located by their perpetrators through public records.

ACP provides victims with a designated (substitute) address that can be used instead of their real address. The designated address can be used by governmental entities, employers, schools, or institutions of higher education, whenever an address is required by public agencies. Private companies are not required by law to use the designated (substitute) address; however, program participants can request they use it.

ACP provides a free mail forwarding service.  All first-class, certified, and registered mail sent to the designated (substitute) address will be processed and forwarded to the participant’s real/confidential address.  This service does not forward 3rd class mail or packages. 

 

ACP is not a witness protection program.  ACP should be a part of an overall safety plan.

How does the Program Work?

Step 1: Interested individuals meet with an Application Assistant or Victim Advocate who can: explain the program; determine whether ACP is a good fit; assist with the ACP application; and submits the application.

Step 2: ACP staff reviews application, certifies the participant, and sends out the ACP participant's ID card and ACP handbook. 

Step 3: ACP Participant changes their address and/or records to the designated (substitute) address.

Step 4: ACP Staff forward all first-class, registered, certified mail and process of service to the participant's confidential address, and help participants navigate the Address Confidentiality Program.

Who can enroll in the Address Confidentiality Program?

An individual 18 years of age or older or an emancipated minor, a parent or guardian acting on behalf of a minor or a ward (incapacitated person) must be:

  • A victim of domestic violence, stalking, sexual assault, human trafficking, or an individual at risk of being threatened or physically harmed.
  • Planning to move.
  • Not listed in the Sex Offender Registry.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • In December 2020, Governor Whitmer signed the Address Confidentiality Program Act, Act 301 of 2020. The Address Confidentiality Program (ACP) was created to provide certain protections for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, human trafficking, or those who fear that disclosure of their physical address will increase the risk of harm.

    ACP operates to shield a program participant’s actual physical address by providing an official designated/substitute address and free mail forwarding service. The participant will receive an ID card to show as proof of participation in the program and a corrected driver’s license or state ID. The designated (substitute) address can be used instead of the program participant’s real address. The designated address can be used by governmental entities, employers, schools, or institutions of higher education, whenever an address is required by public agencies. Private companies are not required by law to use the substitute address; however, program participants can request they use it.

  • Though the law provides us with two years to implement the program, we will be working as quickly as possible because we recognize the importance of the critical protections that this law provides. ACP is expected to launch by early spring of 2023. (The date is subject to change)

  • You can email the ACP if you have any questions. Once the program is available, application assistants and victim advocates will be trained throughout the state to assist you with enrolling in the program. When the program goes live, a list of these application assistants will be available on the website.

  • If you are a victim of domestic violence, stalking, human trafficking, or sexual assault, we recommend you reach out to your local victim services organization to discuss safety planning and resources available to you.  Local organizations can be found here: Find Services In Your Area. If you are in immediate danger, call 911.