Landowners can help reduce risk of CWD spread with disease control permits

Contact: Chad Stewart, 517-284-4745
Agency: Natural Resources

Jan. 30, 2020

Map of townships eligible for disease control permitsLandowners in specific townships in the Lower Peninsula chronic wasting disease management zone can apply for disease control permits to help manage deer populations on their properties. Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological disease affecting deer, elk and moose.


Disease control permits are valid for use outside the deer hunting seasons and are free of charge. They are available in select townships in Clinton, Eaton, Gratiot, Hillsdale, Ionia, Ingham, Isabella, Jackson, Kent and Montcalm counties. See map of townships eligible for disease control permits.

Landowners interested in applying for the permits may contact Sarah Carlson at 269-685-6853.

As part of the disease control permit process, any deer taken must be submitted for CWD testing. After deer head(s) are properly tagged, labeled deer heads should be delivered to a local self-serve drop box or field office:

  • Clinton/Gratiot/Ingham/Isabella County area:
    • Ithaca Department of Public Works (210 S. Elm St., Ithaca)
    • Rose Lake Field Office (8903 East Stoll Road, East Lansing). An appointment must be made, by calling 517-641-4092, to make sure someone will be there to receive the deer head.
  • Eaton County:
    • Contact the Barry State Game Area Field Office at 269-795-3280 to arrange.
  • Ionia/Kent/Montcalm County area:
    • Drop box freezer at Flat River State Game Area Field Office (6650 Long Lake Road, Belding)
  • Jackson County:
    • Waterloo Field Office (13578 Seymour Road, Grass Lake). An appointment must be made, by calling 313-396-6890, to make sure someone will be there to receive the deer head.

Each year, CWD surveillance goals are created to help biologists understand the scale of the disease in the local deer herd. Deer heads are still needed for testing, especially from Gratiot, Isabella and Jackson counties, to meet the CWD surveillance goals set in 2019.

For more information about CWD in Michigan, visit Michigan.gov/CWD.