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Michigan Clean Diesel Program

Clean Diesel Request for Proposal (RFP) for 2023

Application Documents:

Informational Webinar 

Michigan Clean Diesel Program Application: February 14, 2023, 1-2 p.m. EST

Contact

Irene Queen
QueenI1@Michigan.gov
517-420-3230

Interested in learning more about commercial electric vehicles that are or will soon be available to order? Here is a partial list.
Disclaimer: The following information has been compiled from available data. There is no guarantee or warranty on the part of the State of Michigan relative thereto as to suitability for use for which it may be desired or in any other respect whatsoever.

Past DERA Projects

  • 2022 Clean Diesel Projects

    Grants were awarded in 2022 for the first electric vehicle projects to be funded through the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy's (EGLE) Michigan Clean Diesel Program. The projects in Livonia and Cadillac replace a 1996 Class 8 Freightliner diesel semi-truck with a new 2022 Nikola Tre BEV Class 8 electric semi-truck, and a 2014 diesel school bus with an electric school bus. 

    Alta Equipment Group in Livonia was awarded $207, 621 toward replacement of a 1996 diesel semi-truck with an electric semi-truck with the following expected emissions reduction. 

     

    Type of Pollutant

    Annual Emission Reductions (tons/year)

    Lifetime Emissions Reductions (tons/year)

    Total Grant Cost Effectiveness

    NOx .545 1.636 $238,927
    P .020 .020 $6,411,503
    HC .018 .018 $7,270,593
    CO .119 .119 $1,092,958
    CO2 33.8 33.8 $3,896
    Amount of grant funding used for project activities: $207, 621 (100%)


    Estimated amount of fuel saved: 3,000 gallons per year.

    Source of Cost Effectiveness Calculations: cfpub.epa.gov/quantifier

    Lansing-based Dean Transportation was awarded $157,500 toward its first electric school bus. 

    Applicant proposals were rated on criteria that include emissions reductions of nitrous oxides and fine particulate matter, transition to alternative fuels, and adoption of zero-emissions and alternate-fueled vehicles. Additionally, the projects were reviewed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Justice Screening Tool. The total award of $365,120 aligns with EPA's Justice40 Initiative, a government effort to deliver at least 40% of the overall benefits from certain federal investments to disadvantaged communities. 

     

  • EGLE Clean Diesel Program Grants replace older diesel engines, improve air quality

    Projects to replace tugboat engines, a forklift that operates adjacent to the Hiawatha National Forest, near the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore and Seney Wildlife Refuge, and older school buses were chosen for funding under the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy's (EGLE) Clean Diesel Program Grant.

    Applicant proposals were rated on criteria that included reductions in nitrous oxides and fine particulate matter, both of which contribute to unhealthy air, greenhouse gases; also rated were the expected lifetime emissions reductions and lowest lifetime costs of emissions reductions. The four projects chosen total $366,150 and will replace older, highly polluting diesel vehicles with new, more efficient, and cleaner operating diesel and propane vehicles and engines.

    The following were approved:

    • Luedtke Engineering Company, $165,372.94: tugboat engine replacement.
    • Livonia Public Schools, $73,529: diesel to propane school bus replacement.
    • Hopkins Public Schools and Allegan Public Schools, $72,125: diesel to diesel school bus replacement.
    • Timber Products, $56,124: Caterpillar forklift replacement.

    The grants were available through the federal Diesel Emissions Reduction Act, funded by EGLE and the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Clean Diesel Program. Twelve applicants requested a total of $1,299,831.

    Due to EPA regulations, newly built diesel engines are cleaner than ever before; however, millions of older, dirtier engines are still in use. In the journey toward zero emissions vehicles, there will be a period of transition, where diesel and propane vehicles with cleaner technologies will be part of a bridge toward new technologies. EGLE's Clean Diesel Program will continue to incentivize zero emission vehicles, and next year's RFP will be focused solely on the replacement of diesel-powered vehicles with zero-emission vehicles and engines.

  • 13 school buses are being replaced under the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) 2020 Clean Diesel Program grants. A consortium of four school districts has been awarded $450,000 to replace diesel buses that are at least 12 years old with new propane- and diesel-powered vehicles.

    Hamilton Community Schools led the consortium that was the successful applicant from among 20 candidates for grants under the federal Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA). Funding is allocated through the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Diesel Program, which is administered by EGLE.

    Grant money is being used toward the purchase of 12 propane buses and one clean diesel bus to replace vehicles from model years 2000-07:

    • Hamilton Community Schools will replace four diesel buses with four propane buses.
    • Allendale Public Schools will replace seven diesel buses with seven propane buses.
    • Allendale Christian School will replace one diesel bus with one propane bus.
    • Saugatuck Public Schools will replace one diesel bus with a new diesel bus.

    The new buses will reduce exposure to harmful exhaust fumes and airborne particles while students are riding or getting on and off buses, and in school where exhaust can be drawn into buildings where students spend most of their days. The Hamilton Consortium project has an estimated lifetime emissions reduction of 2.359 short tons of NOx and .185 short tons of PM2.5.

  • Eight school districts decommissioned a total of 28 old diesel school buses and replaced them with 20 new diesel and eight new propane school buses. These projects will improve air quality and reduce children's exposure to harmful diesel emissions in and around the school bus and along the routes they serve. Collectively, these projects will result in the following lifetime emission reductions reported in short tons: NOx 12.74, PM 1.121, HC 1.805, CO 5.660, CO2 1669.32.

    Details on funding and the number of school buses replaced for each project are as follows:

    • Fennville Public Schools received $22,760 of Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program funds to replace one old diesel school bus with one new diesel school bus.
    • Fowlerville Community Schools received $110,358 of Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program funds to replace five old diesel school buses with five new propane school buses.
    • Hamilton Community Schools received $69,335 of Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program funds to replace three old diesel school buses with three new propane school buses.
    • Hillsdale Community Schools received $23,234 of Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program funds to replace one old diesel school bus with one new diesel school bus.
    • Hopkins Public Schools received $43,538 of Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program funds to replace two old diesel school buses with two new diesel school buses.
    • Livonia Public Schools received $71,441 of Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program funds to replace five old special education diesel school buses with five new special education diesel school buses.
    • Ludington Area Schools received $129,885 of Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program funds to replace six old diesel school buses with six new diesel school buses.
    • Wayne-Westland Community School District received $135,545 of Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program funds to replace five old diesel school buses with five new diesel school buses.
  • The City of Hillsdale successfully replaced three old dump/plow trucks with new 2018 model vehicles. The project will decrease emissions by an estimated 4.2 tons annually and contribute to a total reduction of 25.4 tons of lifetime emissions. The City of Hillsdale received $107,000 in grant funds from the 2018 Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program to complete this project.

    Southwest Detroit Environmental Vision (SDEV) partnered with Gemini Transport, LLC, to remove one of their legacy Class 8 diesel trucks operating in southwest Detroit and replace it with a new 2018 diesel truck. SDEV reports that the one class 8 truck replaced in the project will result in lifetime emission reductions totaling 87.9 tons in southwest Detroit neighborhoods. SDEV received $42,665 in grant funds from the 2018 Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program to complete this project.

  • Alger County Road Commission successfully replaced two old heavy-duty highway maintenance trucks with two new 2017, heavy-duty highway maintenance trucks. This project is helping to improve air quality by reducing particulate matter, oxides of nitrogen, greenhouse gases, and volatile organic compounds. The new trucks are also using less diesel fuel and are providing health benefits to workers in maintenance and storage buildings. The Alger County Road Commission was granted $66,095 to complete this project.

    Monroe County Road Commission has successfully replaced three old tandem axle trucks and one single axle truck with three new tandem axle trucks and one new single axle truck. This project is located in a priority area and is helping to improve air quality by reducing particulate matter, oxides of nitrogen, greenhouse gases, and volatile organic compounds. The Monroe County Road Commission was granted $193,690 to complete this project.

    SDEV successfully replaced three old vehicles with three new vehicles that operate primarily in Detroit and Dearborn, but also travel throughout other parts of Southeast Michigan. SDEV partnered with H & P Transportation to replace one old heavy-duty truck and with National Industrial Maintenance to replace two old street sweepers. This project is located in a priority area and is helping to improve air quality by reducing particulate matter, oxides of nitrogen, greenhouse gases, and volatile organic compounds. SDEV was granted $210,000 to complete this project.

  • SDEV has successfully completed the replacement of an old high-polluting truck with a new clean diesel truck that meets or exceeds the current highest U.S. EPA emissions standards.  SDEV received $46,562 in federal funds from the 2016 Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program to complete this project.

    SDEV's partner, Gemini Transport, replaced a 2003 heavy duty truck with a 2016 truck that will decrease diesel emissions by an estimated 2 tons annually and contribute to a total reduction of 11.4 tons of lifetime emissions. These reductions will help to improve air quality and reduce exposure to diesel emissions in Wayne, Kent, and Saginaw Counties, with the majority of health impact benefits occurring in Detroit and Dearborn, Michigan.

    During the project period, SDEV and its partners were able to complete one of the five proposed vehicle replacements.

  • SDEV successfully completed the replacement of five old high-polluting trucks with five new clean diesel trucks that meet or exceed the current highest U.S. EPA emissions standards. SDEV received $124,550 in grant funds from the 2015 Michigan Clean Diesel Grant Program to complete this project.

    The project partners involved three private fleets, Causley Trucking, Foreman Brothers, and Gemini Transport, located in Wayne County and one non-profit fleet, Forgotten Harvest, located in Oakland County. Collectively these new vehicles decreased diesel emissions by over 6.5 tons annually and will contribute to a total reduction of 105.7 tons of lifetime emissions. These reductions help to improve air quality and reduce exposure to diesel emissions in Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Monroe, and Kent Counties.