Learn the 3Cs!



Get to know the 3Cs: Choose, Clean & Cook!

 

You can reduce some of the chemicals in the fish by nearly half. Follow the 3Cs! 

 

A general rule of thumb is to remember to be S.A.F.E.

  • Smaller fish are usually a good choice.
  • Avoid large fish, predator fish & bottom-feeders.
  • Fat should be removed.
  • Eat fish that have been broiled or grilled on a rack.

Choose

Smaller fish are usually a good choice.
Panfish, like bluegill and perch, tend to have fewer chemicals in them. The DNR's regulation guide can help you find what sizes are legal to keep.

Avoid large fish, predator fish & bottom-feeders.
Higher amounts of chemicals build up in older fish, fish that eat other fish, and fish that feed off the bottom. It's important to use the Eat Safe Fish Guide to find lakes and rivers with fish that are lower in chemicals.

Clean

Fat should be removed.
Some of the chemicals are stored in the fat. Because some chemicals* are stored in the fat, removing the fat will help to get rid of some of the chemicals. Download our flyer to learn how to filet your fish and remove fat. 

 

Cook

Eat fish that have been broiled or grilled on a rack.
More fat can drip away from your fish this way. If you remove the skin or poke holes in it, and then cook your fish on a grill or broiler pan, even more fat and chemicals can drip away. If you fry your fish, don’t reuse the oil.
 

Learn more about the 3Cs in the Eat Safe Fish in Michigan brochure! 

 


* Mercury can't be removed from fish by cleaning and cooking. Mercury is in the filet of the fish - the part that we eat. If you eat a lot of fish, it's best to check the Eat Safe Fish Guide for information on safer fish to eat before you head out fishing. For lakes, rivers, and fish not listed in the ESF Guide, you can use the Statewide Safe Fish Guidelines to choose safer fish.

 

  

 


  

Want to learn more?

Click here to print or download any of our fish materials. 

Or you can call 1-800-648-6942 to request that a
MDCH Eat Safe Fish packet be mailed to you.

  

Return to the Michigan Eat Safe Fish homepage.