Michigan awarded $1.65 million hereditary cancer grant by CDC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Dec. 16, 2019

CONTACT: Lynn Sutfin, 517-241-2112

LANSING, Mich. – The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) Lifecourse Epidemiology and Genomics Division has received a $1.65 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The funds will be used to increase screening for family cancer history, and the use of genetic counseling and testing for hereditary cancer syndromes over the next three years.

MDHHS is one of four recipients to be awarded the CDC Cancer Genomics Program: Translating Research into Public Health funding opportunity, which supports the implementation and evaluation of activities and strategies related to screening cancer family history and the use of genetic counseling and testing. Oregon, Washington and Utah were also awarded funds. Michigan will receive $550,000 annually for the next three years under the grant terms.

“Being aware of your family history and receiving a referral for cancer genetic counseling can help clarify risk,” said Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, chief medical executive and chief deputy for health for MDHHS. “This grant will help Michigan continue efforts toward increased screening and testing.”

With this grant, MDHHS will continue the promotion and support of hereditary cancer genomic services. This will include community and provider education, patient and provider resources, surveillance, community events related to hereditary cancer and policy/systems review and change. 

The grant focuses primarily on Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) and Lynch syndrome. HBOC is a condition which can cause an increased risk of breast, ovarian, pancreatic and prostate cancer in an affected person. Lynch syndrome is a condition which can cause an increased risk of colorectal, endometrial, ovarian, gastric, small bowel and other cancers. 

Michigan has been a recipient of the CDC Cancer Genomic Program Cooperative Agreement since 2008.

 

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