Lead water pipes can sometimes be found in older homes. Drinking water faucets manufactured before 2014 were allowed to contain up to 8 percent lead. This lead can sometimes find its way into our drinking water. Pick the right filter.

Lead found in drinking water is soluble or particulate. Soluble lead is lead that is dissolved in water. Particulate lead is small pieces of lead from lead-containing material. Either type of lead can get into your drinking water when pipes or faucets containing lead begin to break down or dissolve. The amount of lead that can end up in drinking water depends on:

  • Water chemistry (what is in the water).
  • Contact with lead-containing items (if it passes through lead plumbing or fixtures).
  • Water use (how often and in what amount water runs through plumbing and fixtures).
  • Construction or plumbing repairs in the street or home (particulate lead can be released).

Lead can also get into drinking water from:

  • Environmental contamination sites.
  • Natural sources in the environment.

Lead can also be found in well water or other ground water sources.

Learn about lead in drinking water by watching, “Together, Let’s Get the Lead Out.

Your water is either from a public water supply or from a private well. If you get a bill for your water, you are on a public water supply. Public water suppliers are required to test household water for lead. Private wells do not have the same requirements.

To learn more about your drinking water, contact:

  • Your public water supplier for their annual water quality report, or Consumer Confidence Report (CCR).
  • Your local health department.

If your public water supplier is not able or willing to sample your home or if you have a private well, you can still get your water tested. Contact a laboratory certified for lead analysis or request information from your local health department to learn more.

Want to learn more about the new Lead and Copper Rule (LCR)?

Visit the Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy’s (EGLE) website for an overview of the Rule, the sampling process, and for additional resources.  Or visit the University of Michigan’s website to read about how they are supporting the implementation of Michigan’s revised Lead and Copper Rule.

WHAT EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES ARE AVAILABLE?

     
Lead in drinking water Cleaning your aerators Limpiando sus aireadores
Lead in drinking water Cleaning your aerators Limpiando sus aireadores
     
PUR Faucet installation Filtro de aqua para grifo PUR BRITA Faucet Filter
PUR faucet filter installation Filtro de aqua para grifo PUR BRITA faucet filter installation
     
Reducing potential lead exposure from drinking water guidance Ruducir la exposicion potencial al plomo del agua potable guia Partial lead service line replacement
Reducing potential lead exposure from drinking water guidance Reducir la exposición potencial al plomo del agua potable guía Partial lead service line replacement
     
Particulate lead in drinking water Plomo particulado en el agua potable orientación Galvanized service lines
Particulate lead in drinking water Plomo particulado en el agua potable orientación Galvanized service lines
     
Construction activity could affect your drinking water Actividades de construcción pueden afectar su agua potable hoja informativa  
Construction activity could affect your drinking water

Actividades de construcción pueden afectar su agua potable hoja informativa

 
     

 

How am I exposed to lead in water?

  • How am I exposed to lead in water?

    Lead might get into your drinking water as your water flows through older service lines, plumbing, pipes, fixtures, and faucets that contain lead.

Learn More

What are the health effects?

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How can I protect myself from lead in water?

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EGLE Resources

  • Regulatory Information

    Regulatory Information

    All community and nontransient noncommunity water supplies are subject to Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) requirements. The LCR establishes action levels for lead and copper based on a 90th percentile level of tap samples. Water supplies must conduct tap monitoring and associated reporting to stay in compliance with the LCR. Click the link above for details regarding 2018 rule changes, reporting guidelines, forms, and templates.

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  • Drinking Water in Schools

    Healthy Water Healthy Kids

    All children need access to healthy water. Quality drinking water is critical to a child's overall health, development and performance. Michigan children spend a significant portion of their day in school or child care facilities. The School Drinking Water Program provides school personnel with training, guidance, and tools on school water management practices, sampling plans, and risk reduction.

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  • Drinking Water Advisory Councils

    Drinking Water Advisory Councils

    Revisions to the LCR established the statewide Drinking Water Advisory Council, and individual Water System Advisory Councils to provide education about lead in drinking water to the state and local communities. The statewide council includes water industry professionals, public health professionals and members of the public. A local council must have five or more people, with at least one being a community resident.

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