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Outdoor Adventure Center - Active Aging Adventures Brunch & Learn: Boat Building in Michigan

Image from cover of Making Waves, book about boat building in Michigan

Outdoor Adventure Center - Active Aging Adventures Brunch & Learn: Boat Building in Michigan

2024-04-23T13:00:00Z 2024-04-23T16:00:00Z Outdoor Adventure Center - Active Aging Adventures Brunch & Learn: Boat Building in Michigan

During this monthly series for active aging adults, participants will have opportunities to meet our on-site educators, listen to guest presenters and take part in various natural resource-themed activities. All programs begin at 9 a.m. and include pastries, coffee and tea upon entry. At 9:30 a.m., presentations will begin, so sit back and enjoy your snack during an exciting and informative program, then wrap up with time to explore the OAC exhibits.

Fee: $8 per person; preregistration required. Payment can be made for groups or individuals.

In April, we'll explore boat building in Michigan.

Michigan will always be known as the automobile capital of the world, but the Great Lakes State boasts a similarly rich heritage in the development of boat building in America. By the late 19th century, Michigan had emerged as the industry’s hub, drawing together the most talented designers, builders and engine makers to produce some of the fastest and most innovative boats ever created. Within decades, gifted Michigan entrepreneurs like Christopher Columbus Smith, John L. Hacker and Gar Wood had established some of the nation’s top boat brands and brought the prospect of boat ownership within reach for American consumers from all income ranges. More than just revolutionizing recreational boating, Michigan boat builders also left their mark on history — from developing the speedy runabouts favored by illicit rum-runners during the Prohibition era to creating the landing craft that carried Allied forces to European and Pacific shores in WWII. In the book "Making Waves," presenter Scott M. Peters explores this intriguing story of people, processes and products — of an industry that evolved in Michigan but would change boating across the world.

Scott M. Peters is retired as curator of collections at the Michigan History Museum in Lansing and a lifelong Great Lakes boater. A frequent contributor to Michigan History Magazine, he has been collecting information on the state’s boat-building industry for the past 25 years.

Register for Brunch & Learn: Boat Building in Michigan.

1801 Atwater Street, Detroit, Michigan, 48207
Event Date

Start: April 23, 2024 9:00 AM

End: April 23, 2024 12:00 PM

Contact Information
Outdoor Adventure Center

During this monthly series for active aging adults, participants will have opportunities to meet our on-site educators, listen to guest presenters and take part in various natural resource-themed activities. All programs begin at 9 a.m. and include pastries, coffee and tea upon entry. At 9:30 a.m., presentations will begin, so sit back and enjoy your snack during an exciting and informative program, then wrap up with time to explore the OAC exhibits.

Fee: $8 per person; preregistration required. Payment can be made for groups or individuals.

In April, we'll explore boat building in Michigan.

Michigan will always be known as the automobile capital of the world, but the Great Lakes State boasts a similarly rich heritage in the development of boat building in America. By the late 19th century, Michigan had emerged as the industry’s hub, drawing together the most talented designers, builders and engine makers to produce some of the fastest and most innovative boats ever created. Within decades, gifted Michigan entrepreneurs like Christopher Columbus Smith, John L. Hacker and Gar Wood had established some of the nation’s top boat brands and brought the prospect of boat ownership within reach for American consumers from all income ranges. More than just revolutionizing recreational boating, Michigan boat builders also left their mark on history — from developing the speedy runabouts favored by illicit rum-runners during the Prohibition era to creating the landing craft that carried Allied forces to European and Pacific shores in WWII. In the book "Making Waves," presenter Scott M. Peters explores this intriguing story of people, processes and products — of an industry that evolved in Michigan but would change boating across the world.

Scott M. Peters is retired as curator of collections at the Michigan History Museum in Lansing and a lifelong Great Lakes boater. A frequent contributor to Michigan History Magazine, he has been collecting information on the state’s boat-building industry for the past 25 years.

Register for Brunch & Learn: Boat Building in Michigan.