Skip to main content

Low-Hanging Fruit

Michigan is dedicated to leading by example. The State began reducing energy consumption in its facilities by identifying low-hanging fruit; quick and easy actions to improve energy performance and efficiency.

Please refer to the projects page for detailed information on the steps taken by the State. For an overview of first steps to consider for improving a building’s energy performance, please see the options below.

Lighting sensors - Controls lighting operations based on multiple types of sensors:
  • Motions sensors - Senses motion to activate or deactivate lighting
  • Occupancy sensors - Detects body heat and motion to turn lights on/off depending on occupancy of the space
  • Vacancy sensors - Automatically turns lights off once the room has been vacated, but must be manually turned on

Proper insulation - Ensuring continuous thermal insulation prevents the loss of hot/cold air, requiring less energy use for climate control

Daylight harvesting - Uses sensors to dim artificial lighting when natural light enters a room

Low flow flush valves - Reduces water used for restroom flushing

Door replacement - Replacing ill-fitting or poorly insulated doors to reduce the loss of hot/cold air

Window replacement - Replacing ill-fitting or poorly insulated windows to reduce the loss of hot/cold air

Variable Frequency Drives (VFD) - Controls speed of motors based on need rather than operating at full power at all times

Steam traps - Testing and replacing leaking steam traps reduces loss of energy

Smart power strips - Eliminates stand-by power of auxiliary technology plugged into the strip once the master appliance powers down

Caulking/sealing - Sealing holes/cracks in the facility limits the loss of hot/cold air

Air filters - Proper fitting and regularly changing air filters improves the efficiency of a facilities HVAC system


Efficient Appliances and Fixtures

Air purifiers, except commercial purifiers, should follow the ENERGY STAR Product Specifications, Version 2.0

Commercial Dishwashers should follow the ENERGY STAR Product Specifications, Version 2.0

Commercial Fryers should follow the ENERGY STAR Product Specifications, Version 2.0.

Commercial Hot-Food Holding Cabinets should follow the ENERGY STAR Product Specifications, Version 2.0

Commercial Ovens should follow the ENERGY STAR Product Specifications, Version 2.2.

Commercial Steam Cookers should follow the EPA ES CFS Steamers Factsheet v11

Computer and Computer Monitors should meet the requirements of California Code of Regulations (C.C.R.) Title 20 § 1605.3(v) and compliance with those requirements shall be measured with test methods detailed in § 1604(v)

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment, also known as electric vehicle charges, should follow the ENERGY STAR Product Specifications, Version 1.0.

Faucets, except for metering faucets, should meet the following metrics when tested using guidelines outlined in Appendix S to Subpart B of Part 430 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations

  • Lavatory faucets and replacement aerators shall not exceed a maximum flow rate of 1.5 gallons per minute at 60 pounds per square inch.
  • Residential kitchen faucets and replacement aerators shall not exceed a maximum flow rate of 1.8 gallons per minute at 60 pounds per square inch, with optional temporary flow of 2.2 gallons per minute, provided they default to a maximum flow rate of 1.8 gallons per minute at 60 pounds per square inch after each use.
  • Public lavatory faucets and replacement aerators shall not exceed a maximum flow rate of 0.5 gallons per minute at 60 pounds per square inch.

Gas Fireplaces should meet the following metrics:

  • Gas fireplaces shall be capable of automatically extinguishing any pilot flame when the main gas burner flame is established and when it is extinguished;
  • Gas fireplaces must prevent any ignition source for the main gas burner flame from operating continuously for more than seven days;
  • Decorative gas fireplaces must have a direct vent configuration, unless marked for replacement use only; and,
  • Heating gas fireplaces shall have a fireplace efficiency greater than or equal to 50% when tested in accordance with CSA P.4.1-15

High CRI, Cold Temperature, and Impact-Resistant Fluorescent Lamps should meet the minimum efficacy requirements contained in Section 430.32(n)(4) of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, as measured in accordance with Appendix R to Subpart B of Part 430 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

Portable electric spas, also known as hot tubs, should meet the requirements of the 2019 American National Standard for Portable Electric Spa Energy Efficiency

Residential ventilating fans should meet the following metrics:

  • Residential ventilating fans shall have a fan motor efficacy of no less than 2.8 cubic feet per minute per watt;
  • All other residential ventilating fans shall have a fan motor efficacy of no less than 1.4 cubic feet per minute per watt for airflows less than 90 cubic feet per minute and no less than 2.8 cubic feet per minute per watt for other airflows when tested in accordance with Home Ventilation Institute Publication 916 "HVI Airflow Test Procedure."

Showerheads should not exceed a maximum flow rate of 2.0 gallons per minute at 80 pounds per square inch when tested in accordance with Appendix S to Subpart B of Part 430 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

Spray Sprinkler Bodies should follow the WaterSense Specifications for Spray Sprinkler Bodies, Version 1.0.

State-Regulated General Service Lamps should meet or exceed a lamp efficacy of 45 lumens per watt, when tested in accordance with Section 430.23(gg) of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

Urinals and Water Closets, also known as toilets, should meet the following criteria:

  • Wall-mounted urinals, except for trough-type urinals, shall have a maximum flush volume of 0.5 gallons per flush.
  • Floor-mounted urinals, except for trough-type urinals, shall have a maximum flush volume of 0.5 gallons per flush.
  • Water closets, except for dual-flush tank-type water closets, shall have a maximum flush volume of 1.28 gallons per flush.
  • Dual-flush tank-type water closets shall have a maximum dual flush effective flush volume of 1.28 gallons per flush

Water coolers should follow the ENERGY STAR Product Specifications, Version 2.0.