Cherry Says Everyone in Michigan Needs to be Counted in 2010 Census

Contact: Megan Brown 517.335.6397

March 12, 2010

In radio address, lieutenant governor says census forms to arrive next week      

LANSING - Lt. Governor John D. Cherry Jr. today said Census Day is April 1, and it's time for everyone in Michigan to be counted.  Cherry made his remarks in delivering this week's radio address on behalf of Governor Granholm.

"Next week, you should receive in the mail your 2010 census form," Cherry said.  "It's important that you fill out your census form and promptly mail it back.  And here's why."

"First, census information is used to determine the number of seats that Michigan and every other state gets in the U.S. House of Representatives," Cherry said.  "Census information also is used in drawing the district lines for seats in the Michigan Senate and the Michigan House of Representatives."

"But one of the most important uses of census information is for the distribution of federal funds," Cherry continued.  "The census helps determine how more than $400 billion in federal funds each year is allocated to states and local communities for important services and infrastructure projects.  This includes things like health care, schools, roads, job training centers, water and sewer systems, and much more."

"For every person in Michigan who isn't counted in the census, our state loses $10,000 in federal funds," Cherry said.  "During these tough economic times in Michigan, we can't afford to be shortchanged during the next 10 years when it comes to our fair share of federal funding.  So it's crucial that you, your family, your neighbors and everyone else be counted in the census."

"When the 2010 census form arrives in your mail next week, please take 10 minutes to answer the 10 questions," Cherry said.  "Then mail it in promptly.  When you fill out and return the census form, you're helping your country, your state and your community.  So be counted."

The governor's weekly radio address is released each Friday and may be heard on broadcast stations across the state.  The address is available for download on the governor's Web site at www.michigan.gov/govtogether with a clip of the quote above.  The radio address also is available as a podcast on the Web site as well as on iTunes and via RSS feed for general distribution to personal MP3 players and home computers.  Links to the audio files and text of today's address follow.

 

Lt. Governor John D. Cherry Jr.
Radio Address - Census

Full:  http://www.michigan.gov/documents/gov/Gov240Full_314256_7.mp3
Edited:  http://www.michigan.gov/documents/gov/Gov240Edit_314257_7.mp3
Quote:  http://www.michigan.gov/documents/gov/Gov240Quote_314258_7.mp3

 

Hello, this is Lt. Governor John Cherry.

Census Day is April 1, and it's time for everyone in Michigan to be counted.  As chair of Michigan's Complete Count Committee, I'm proud to be part of the effort to make sure everyone is counted in Michigan.

Next week, you should receive in the mail your 2010 census form.  This is one of the shortest census forms in history - 10 questions that you can answer in 10 minutes.

It's important that you fill out your census form and promptly mail it back. And here's why.

First, census information is used to determine the number of seats that Michigan and every other state gets in the U.S. House of Representatives.  If not everyone in Michigan is counted, it could mean the difference between keeping a congressional seat or losing one.

Census information also is used in drawing the district lines for seats in the Michigan Senate and the Michigan House of Representatives.  Undercounts can affect how those lines are drawn, and could cause certain areas of the state to be underrepresented in the state legislature.

But one of the most important uses of census information is for the distribution of federal funds.  The census helps determine how more than $400 billion in federal funds each year is allocated to states and local communities for important services and infrastructure projects.  This includes things like health care, schools, roads, job training centers, water and sewer systems, and much more.

For every person in Michigan who isn't counted in the census, our state loses $10,000 in federal funds.  To put this in perspective, for every 1,000 people in Michigan not counted, our state would lose $10 million in federal funds.

During these tough economic times in Michigan, we can't afford to be shortchanged during the next 10 years when it comes to our fair share of federal funding.  So it's crucial that you, your family, your neighbors and everyone else be counted in the census.

Some people are leery of filling out the census form because they believe their private information will be made public.  It won't be.  Private information is never published, and federal law protects the confidentiality of all of your information.  There are severe penalties for anyone who violates this law.

When the 2010 census form arrives in your mail next week, please take 10 minutes to answer the 10 questions.  Then mail it in promptly.  When you fill out and return the census form, you're helping your country, your state and your community. So be counted, and thanks for listening.

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