Citizens Redistricting Commission frequently asked questions

We will update this page as more information becomes available. In the meantime, we hope the following FAQ will help answer your questions.

Q: What is the citizens redistricting commission?

In November 2018, Michigan voters approved ballot Proposal 2, a constitutional amendment to “establish a commission of citizens with exclusive authority to adopt district boundaries for the Michigan Senate, Michigan House of Representatives and U.S. Congress, every 10 years.” Now, the Michigan constitution empowers an independent commission of citizens to draw district lines for the Michigan Legislature and Michigan’s members of Congress for the 2022 election.

Q: Who will serve on the citizens redistricting commission?

The constitutional amendment establishes a commission of 13 registered voters randomly selected through an application process. Of the 13 commissioners, four will affiliate with the Democratic Party, four will affiliate with the Republican Party, and five will not identify with either of those political parties.

Q: Can I apply to be a member of the citizens redistricting commission?

Michigan registered voters can apply to serve. 

However, the constitutional amendment outlines certain groups of people who are not eligible to serve on the commission, including partisan political officials, candidates, registered lobbyist agents, and their employees or close relatives. You can read more more specifics in the constitutional amendment here.

Q: When and where can I apply to be a member of the citizens redistricting commission?

Our office is in the process of developing the application and informational materials to provide to interested voters. Those interested in serving on the commission will be able to apply starting no later than January 1, 2020. The deadline for applying  is June 1, 2020, and commissioners will be selected no later than September 1, 2020.

Q: When will the citizens redistricting commission begin meeting?

The commission will begin meeting in the fall of 2020, no later than October 15, 2020. 

Q: When will the district lines proposed by the citizens redistricting commission take effect?

According to the constitutional amendment, the commission will use data from the 2020 federal decennial census to draw district lines that will take effect prior to the 2022 elections.

Q: What is the citizens redistricting commission timeline?

Important upcoming dates established by the constitutional amendment are as follows:

January 1, 2020 – Applications to serve on the commission must be made available and mailed to thousands of Michigan registered voters at random.

June 1, 2020 – Deadline for accepting applications

September 1, 2020 – Deadline for selecting the 13 commissioners 

October 15, 2020 – Commissioners must hold first meeting by this date

November 1, 2021 – Deadline for the commission to adopt a redistricting plan for Michigan State House, Michigan State Senate, and U.S. Congressional Districts

Q: Where can I read this section of the Michigan constitution?

In November 2018, Michigan voters passed ballot Proposal 2, a constitutional amendment to “establish a commission of citizens with exclusive authority to adopt district boundaries for the Michigan Senate, Michigan House of Representatives and U.S. Congress, every 10 years.”
You can read this section of the Michigan constitution here

Q: Why does the application to serve on the Commission have to be notarized?

The Michigan Constitution requires in Article IV, Section 6(2)(a)(iii) that applicants “attest under oath” that they meet the qualifications to serve on the Commission.  The phrase “attest under oath” is used elsewhere in Michigan law to require that a document be notarized.

Q: The constitution says for many of the eligibility characteristics that a commissioner must “not currently or in the past 6 years” hold particular offices or jobs. When does that six year time frame begin?

The constitution’s ineligibility criteria and six year time frame applies to “commissioners” – as opposed to “applicants” – so the six years is from the date commissioners will be selected. The final selection of 13 commissioners must be done any time by September 1, 2020, but can be done in any time in August 2020 after strikes are received from the legislature. The draft application for our office uses August 15, 2020 as a reasonable mid-point after which it is likely the commissioners will be seated.