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Example 16

Example 16

Example 16

<span style="font-size:22px;">Deceased voters' ballots are not counted</span>

Applications sent to registered voters who have died do not result in a ballot being sent to the voter, because the dead voter cannot return the application with a signature, let alone one that matches the signature the clerk has on file with their voter registration.

If a living voter casts an absentee ballot prior to Election Day and the clerk learns they have died before Election Day, the deceased voter’s ballot is rejected. This resulted in the rejection of thousands of ballots in Michigan’s August Primary and November General elections.

Following the general election, lists began circulating with thousands of names of people who allegedly had votes cast in their name and were allegedly dead. However, the lists did not contain enough information to accurately compare them to the Michigan’s voter registration list. Further, when the Bureau of Elections has drawn samples of the voters’ names, and reviewed those names against the voter file, they have not encountered cases showing ballots were actually cast on behalf of deceased individuals. Rather, the confusion is often based on people having similar names, being assigned a placeholder birth year in the voter file when the birth date is not known, or a clerical error by the local clerk. A more detailed explanation is available here.