Gov. Rick Snyder makes appointments to the Michigan Committee on Juvenile Justice

Thursday, March 29, 2018

LANSING, Mich. – Gov. Rick Snyder today announced the initial appointments to the restructured Michigan Committee on Juvenile Justice.

Created by Executive Order 2012-1, the committee advises the governor on juvenile justice issues and guides effective implementation of juvenile justice policies and programs. The recent signing of Executive Order 2017-12 restructured the committee to be composed of between 15 and 33 members to comply with the federal Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act.

"I thank these individuals for their dedication to the juvenile justice system,” Snyder said. “Their vast and diverse experience gives me confidence in their ability to serve the state well.”

Terms Expiring Dec. 31, 2018:

Kathleen Bailey of Plainwell is a professor and the director of the School of Criminal Justice at Grand Valley State University. She is also a consultant for the Adolescent Sex Offenders Treatment Program Evaluation of Kent County 17th Circuit Court, and a member of the State of Michigan Juvenile Justice Vision 20/20 Executive Committee. She holds a bachelor’s degree in education and art from Central Michigan University, as well as a master’s degree in clinical mental health and a doctorate in counseling psychology from Western Michigan University. She will represent youth workers involved with programs that are alternatives to incarceration, including programs providing organized recreation activities.

Shenetta Coleman of Redford Township is the director of juvenile and youth services at Wayne County Health, Veterans, and Community Wellness. She holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and a master’s degree in sociology from Eastern Michigan University, as well as a Doctor of Philosophy degree from Capella University. She will represent public agencies concerned with delinquency prevention or treatment.

Bob Higgins of Portage previously served as the safe school’s consultant at the Michigan Department of Education and served in numerous roles within schools and school districts. Higgins holds a bachelor’s degree in secondary education and a master’s degree in educational leadership, both from Western Michigan University. He will represent persons with special experience and competence in addressing problems related to school violence and vandalism and alternatives to suspension and expulsion.

Sandra Lindsey of Lathrup Village is the chief executive officer of the Saginaw County Community Mental Health Authority. Before her current role, Lindsey served as executive director of the Oakland County Community Mental Health Authority. Lindsey holds a bachelor’s degree in social work from Wayne State University and a master’s degree in social work from the University of Michigan. She will represent persons with special experience and competence in addressing problems related to learning disabilities, emotional difficulties, child abuse and neglect, and youth violence.

Joseph Ryan of Ann Arbor is an associate professor at the University of Michigan School of Social Work, a faculty associate for the Center for Political Studies, and the co-director of the Child and Adolescent Data Lab. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, a master’s degree in social work from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in social work from the University of Chicago. He will represent public agencies concerned with delinquency prevention or treatment.

Terms Expiring Dec. 31, 2019:

Lawrence Emig of Reed City is an Osceola County commissioner, the Strong Families/Safe Children coordinator for the Osceola County office of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, continuum of care coordinator for Mecosta/Osceola Continuum of Care, director of community relations for the Osceola County Community Foundation, and payroll marketing specialist for Hinkle-Witbeck Insurance. He has been in the human services field for more than 30 years. Emig holds a bachelor’s degree in sociology and a master’s degree in education, both from Central Michigan University. He will represent locally elected officials representing general purpose local government.

Mary Beth Kelly of Grosse Ile is Arbitrator and Mediator at JAMS in Detroit. In the past, she has served as a Justice on the Michigan Supreme Court and vice chair of Bodman’s Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution practice group. Kelly holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Michigan-Dearborn and a Juris doctorate from Notre Dame Law School. She will represent volunteers who work with delinquents or potential delinquents and will serve as chair for a term expiring at the pleasure of the Governor.

Sandra Metcalf of Grand Haven is director of juvenile services for the 20th Circuit Court. She has more than 40 years of experience in juvenile justice, working as a family therapist. Metcalf holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Michigan State University and a master’s degree in human services from Capella University. She will represent law enforcement and juvenile justice agencies.

Kenyatta Stephens of Farmington Hills is COO of Black Family Development Inc. She has 17 years of juvenile justice prevention, diversion, treatment, and administration experience. Stephens holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Pennsylvania. She will represent private nonprofit organizations with a special focus on the following: preserving and strengthening families, parent groups and parent self-help groups, youth development, delinquency prevention and treatment, neglected or dependent children, the quality of juvenile justice, education, religious and community groups, nongovernmental victim advocacy organizations, or social services for children.

Thomas Weichel of Spruce currently serves as the prosecuting attorney for Alcona County. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Ferris State University and a Juris Doctorate from Detroit College of Law. He will represent law enforcement and juvenile justice agencies.

Terms Expiring Dec. 31, 2020:

Corey Haines of Madison Heights is the chief of police for the City of Madison Heights. He holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice with a concentration in public administration from Saginaw Valley State University and is currently pursuing his Juris Doctorate at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. He will represent law enforcement and juvenile justice agencies.

DaQuan Harrison of Ypsilanti is the president of Youth Action of Michigan as well as the federal school liaison at the Student Advocacy Center in Ypsilanti, Michigan. He is currently attending Washtenaw Community College. He will represent persons who have been or are currently involved in the juvenile justice system.

Marquaun Kane of Ann Arbor will represent persons who have been or are currently involved in the juvenile justice system.

Antonio Leija of Greenville is an AYSO referee and a middle school basketball assistant coach. He has interned with the IM SAFE Child Advocacy Center, as well as the Juvenile Court, District Court, and Prosecutor’s Office in Montcalm County. He will represent persons who have been or are currently involved in the juvenile justice system.

MaryAnn Sarosi of Ann Arbor serves as the special assistant to the executive director of Legal Services of South Central Michigan and Principal at Sarosi Group. She holds a bachelor’s degree in history and a Juris Doctorate from the University of Michigan. She will represent volunteers who work with delinquents or potential delinquents.

After initial appointments, members will serve three-year terms. 

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