Gov. Rick Snyder makes initial appointments to Environmental Science Advisory Board

Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018

LANSING, Mich. – Gov. Rick Snyder today announced initial appointments to the Environmental Science Advisory Board.

Pursuant to Public Act 269 of 2018, the Environmental Science Advisory Board was created within the Michigan Department of Technology, Management, and Budget to advise the governor and the state of Michigan on issues affecting the protection of the environment and the management of natural resources in this state.The board is comprised of nine members appointed by the Governor with expertise in a scientific field or other discipline that the Governor considers appropriate.

“Each individual has a unique skillset that gives me confidence they will work well together to ensure Michigan’s natural resources and environment are preserved and protected," Snyder said.

Terms expiring Oct. 4, 2019:
Kimberlee Kearfott of Ann Arbor is a professor of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences, biomedical engineering and applied physics at the University of Michigan. She serves as a member of the United States Department of Energy Environmental Management Advisory Board, appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Energy. Kearfott holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from St. Mary’s University in Nova Scotia, Canada, a master’s degree in nuclear engineering from the University of Virginia and a doctorate in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dianne McCormick of Howell is director/health officer of the Livingston County Health Department, where she previously served as director of environmental health. She holds a bachelor’s degree in environmental health from Indiana State University and a master’s degree in administration from Central Michigan University.

Ashley Moerke of Sault Sainte Marie is director of the Center for Freshwater Research and Education and a professor for the School of Natural Resources and Environment at Lake Superior State University. She holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Minnesota – Duluth and a master’s degree and doctorate in biology from the University of Notre Dame.

Terms expiring Oct. 4, 2020:
Lawrence Lemke of Mt. Pleasant is a professor and chair of the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Central Michigan University. His current research encompasses hydrogeology/groundwater contaminate fate and transport, air pollution and soil contamination. He holds a bachelor’s degree in geology from Michigan State University, a master’s degree in geosciences from the University of Arizona, a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Denver and a doctorate in environmental engineering form the University of Michigan.

Steven Pernecky of Ann Arbor is a professor in the Department of Chemistry and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences for Eastern Michigan University. He holds a bachelor’s degree in biology and a doctorate in Pharmacology from Northwestern University.

George Wolff of Farmington Hills is a principal scientist for the environmental consulting firm Air Improvement Resource, Inc. He was previously a technical fellow and principal scientist for General Motors Public Policy Center and served on the Unites States Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board. Wolff holds a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology, a master’s degree in meteorology from New York University and a doctorate in environmental science from Rutgers University.

Terms expiring Oct. 4, 2021:
Lauren Brown of Ann Arbor is an associate and scientist for Abt Associates with experience in chemical risk assessment. She holds a bachelor’s degree in zoology and environmental science from Miami University and a master’s degree in environmental health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

John Matonich of Marenisco is retired CEO. He is board chair for Rowe Professional Services Company, Inc. and previously served as chair of the Michigan Natural Resources Commission. Matonich is a licensed professional surveyor and holds a bachelor’s degree in land surveying from Michigan Technological University.

Joan Rose of Williamston is a professor, Homer Nowlin Endowed chair for Water Research, and co-director for the Center for Advancing Microbial Risk Assessment at Michigan State University. She serves on the Health Professionals Advisory Board of the International Joint Commission, the Board of Trustees for the Nature Conservancy in Michigan and the Board of Directors for the International Water Association. Rose holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Arizona, a master’s degree in microbiology from the University of Wyoming and a docotrate in microbiology from the University of Arizona. Rose will serve as chair at the pleasure of the governor.

After initial appointments, members serve three-year terms.

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