Executive Order 2020-184: Safeguards to protect Michigan's workers from COVID-19

EXECUTIVE ORDER

 

No. 2020-184

 

Safeguards to protect Michigan’s workers from COVID-19

 

Rescission of Executive Order 2020-175

 

 

Businesses must continue to do their part to protect their employees, their patrons, and their communities. Many businesses have already done so by implementing robust safeguards to prevent viral transmission. But we can and must do more: no one should feel unsafe at work. With a series of prior executive orders, I created workplace standards that apply to all businesses across the state. I am now rescinding and reissuing an amended version of those standards to reflect recent changes in the Safe Start order.

 

The safeguards in this order are in addition to any other requirements provided by law, including the Safe Start order and any other relevant emergency orders.

 

 

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease that can result in serious illness or death. It is caused by a new strain of coronavirus not previously identified in humans and easily spread from person to person. There is currently no approved vaccine or antiviral treatment for this disease.

On March 10, 2020, the Department of Health and Human Services identified the first two presumptive-positive cases of COVID-19 in Michigan. On that same day, I issued Executive Order 2020-4. This order declared a state of emergency across the state of Michigan under section 1 of article 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, the Emergency Management Act, 1976 PA 390, as amended (EMA), MCL 30.401 et seq., and the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945, 1945 PA 302, as amended (EPGA), MCL 10.31 et seq.

Since then, the virus spread across Michigan, bringing deaths in the thousands, confirmed cases in the tens of thousands, and deep disruption to this state’s economy, homes, and educational, civic, social, and religious institutions. On April 1, 2020, in response to the widespread and severe health, economic, and social harms posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, I issued Executive Order 2020-33. This order expanded on Executive Order 2020-4 and declared both a state of emergency and a state of disaster across the State of Michigan under section 1 of article 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, the Emergency Management Act, and the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945. And on April 30, 2020, finding that COVID-19 had created emergency and disaster conditions across the State of Michigan, I issued Executive Order 2020-67 to continue the emergency declaration under the EPA, as well as Executive Order 2020-68 to issue new emergency and disaster declarations under the EMA.

Those executive orders have been challenged in Michigan House of Representatives and Michigan Senate v. Whitmer. On August 21, 2020, the Court of Appeals ruled that the Governor’s declaration of a state of emergency, her extensions of the state of emergency, and her issuance of related EOs clearly fell within the scope of the Governor’s authority under the EPGA.

On September 3, 2020, I issued Executive Order 2020-177, again finding that the COVID-19 pandemic constitutes a disaster and emergency throughout the State of Michigan. That order constituted a state of emergency declaration under the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945. And, to the extent the governor may declare a state of emergency and a state of disaster under the Emergency Management Act when emergency and disaster conditions exist yet the legislature had declined to grant an extension request, that order also constituted a state of emergency and state of disaster declaration under that act.

The Emergency Powers of the Governor Act provides a sufficient legal basis for issuing this executive order. In relevant part, it provides that, after declaring a state of emergency, “the governor may promulgate reasonable orders, rules, and regulations as he or she considers necessary to protect life and property or to bring the emergency situation within the affected area under control.” MCL 10.31(1).

Nevertheless, subject to the ongoing litigation and the possibility that current rulings may be overturned or otherwise altered on appeal, I also invoke the Emergency Management Act as a basis for executive action to combat the spread of COVID-19 and mitigate the effects of this emergency on the people of Michigan, with the intent to preserve the rights and protections provided by the EMA. The EMA vests the governor with broad powers and duties to “cop[e] with dangers to this state or the people of this state presented by a disaster or emergency,” which the governor may implement through “executive orders, proclamations, and directives having the force and effect of law.” MCL 30.403(1)–(2). This executive order falls within the scope of those powers and duties, and to the extent the governor may declare a state of emergency and a state of disaster under the Emergency Management Act when emergency and disaster conditions exist yet the legislature has not granted an extension request, they too provide a sufficient legal basis for this order.

 

 

Acting under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, I find it reasonable and necessary, for the reasons outlined above, to order:

  1. Workplace safeguards for all businesses. All businesses or operations that require their employees to leave the homes or residences for work must, at a minimum:
    1. Develop a COVID-19 preparedness and response plan, consistent with recommendations in Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19, developed by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (“OSHA”) and available here. Within two weeks of resuming in-person activities, a business’s or operation’s plan must be made readily available to employees, labor unions, and customers, whether via website, internal network, or by hard copy.
    2. Designate one or more worksite supervisors to implement, monitor, and report on the COVID-19 control strategies developed under subsection (a) of this section. The supervisor must remain on-site at all times when employees are present on site. An on-site employee may be designated to perform the supervisory role.
    3. Provide COVID-19 training to employees that covers, at a minimum:
      1. Workplace infection-control practices.
      2. The proper use of personal protective equipment.
      3. Steps the employee must take to notify the business or operation of any symptoms of COVID-19 or a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19.
      4. How to report unsafe working conditions.
    4. Provide any communication and training on COVID-19 infection control practices in the primary languages common in the employee population.
    5. Place posters in the languages common in the employee population that encourage staying home when sick, cough and sneeze etiquette, and proper hand-hygiene practices.
    6. Conduct a daily entry self-screening protocol for all employees or contractors entering the workplace, including, at a minimum, a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19.
    7. Keep everyone on the worksite premises at least six feet from one another to the maximum extent possible, including through the use of ground markings, signs, and physical barriers, as appropriate to the worksite.
    8. Provide non-medical grade face coverings to their employees, with supplies of N95 masks and surgical masks reserved, for now, for health care professionals, first responders (e.g., police officers, fire fighters, paramedics), and other critical workers.
    9. Require face coverings to be worn when employees cannot consistently maintain six feet of separation from other individuals in the workplace, and consider face shields when employees cannot consistently maintain three feet of separation from other individuals in the workplace.
    10. Require face coverings in shared spaces, including during in-person meetings and in restrooms and hallways.
    11. Increase facility cleaning and disinfection to limit exposure to COVID-19, especially on high-touch surfaces (e.g., door handles), paying special attention to parts, products, and shared equipment (e.g., tools, machinery, vehicles).
    12. Adopt protocols to clean and disinfect the facility in the event of a positive COVID-19 case in the workplace.
    13. Make cleaning supplies available to employees upon entry and at the worksite and provide time for employees to wash hands frequently or to use hand sanitizer.
    14. When an employee or known patron is identified with a confirmed case of COVID-19:
      1. Immediately notify the local public health department, and
      2. Within 24 hours, notify any co-workers, contractors, or suppliers who may have come into contact with the person with a confirmed case of COVID-19.
    15. Allow employees with a confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19 to return to the workplace only after they are no longer infectious according to the latest guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”) and they are released from any quarantine or isolation by the local public health department.
    16. Follow Executive Order 2020-172, and any executive orders that follow it, that prohibit discharging, disciplining, or otherwise retaliating against employees who stay home or who leave work when they are at particular risk of infecting others with COVID-19.
    17. Establish a response plan for dealing with a confirmed infection in the workplace, including protocols for sending employees home and for temporary closures of all or part of the workplace to allow for deep cleaning.
    18. Restrict business-related travel for employees to essential travel only.
    19. Encourage employees to use personal protective equipment and hand sanitizer on public transportation.
    20. Promote remote work to the fullest extent possible.
    21. Adopt any additional infection-control measures that are reasonable in light of the work performed at the worksite and the rate of infection in the surrounding community.
  2. Outdoor work. Businesses or operations whose work is primarily and traditionally performed outdoors must:
    1. Prohibit gatherings of any size in which people cannot maintain six feet of distance from one another.
    2. Limit in-person interaction with clients and patrons to the maximum extent possible, and bar any such interaction in which people cannot maintain six feet of distance from one another.
    3. Provide and require the use of personal protective equipment such as gloves, goggles, face shields, and face coverings, as appropriate for the activity being performed.
    4. Adopt protocols to limit the sharing of tools and equipment to the maximum extent possible and to ensure frequent and thorough cleaning and disinfection of tools, equipment, and frequently touched surfaces.
  3. Construction. Businesses or operations in the construction industry must:
    1. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering a worksite, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with, if possible, a temperature screening.
    2. Create dedicated entry point(s) at every worksite, if possible, for daily screening as provided in subsection (a) of this section, or in the alternative issue stickers or other indicators to employees to show that they received a screening before entering the worksite that day.
    3. Provide instructions for the distribution of personal protective equipment and designate on-site locations for soiled face coverings.
    4. Require the use of work gloves where appropriate to prevent skin contact with contaminated surfaces.
    5. Identify choke points and high-risk areas where employees must stand near one another (such as hallways, hoists and elevators, break areas, water stations, and buses) and control their access and use (including through physical barriers) so that social distancing is maintained.
    6. Ensure there are sufficient hand-washing or hand-sanitizing stations at the worksite to enable easy access by employees.
    7. Notify contractors (if a subcontractor) or owners (if a contractor) of any confirmed COVID-19 cases among employees at the worksite.
    8. Restrict unnecessary movement between project sites.
    9. Create protocols for minimizing personal contact upon delivery of materials to the worksite.
  4. Manufacturing. Manufacturing facilities must:
    1. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering the facility, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with temperature screening.
    2. Create dedicated entry point(s) at every facility for daily screening as provided in subsection (a) of this section, and ensure physical barriers are in place to prevent anyone from bypassing the screening.
    3. Train employees on, at a minimum:
      1. Routes by which the virus causing COVID-19 is transmitted from person to person.
      2. Distance that the virus can travel in the air, as well as the time it remains viable in the air and on environmental surfaces.
      3. The use of personal protective equipment, including the proper steps for putting it on and taking it off.
    4. Reduce congestion in common spaces wherever practicable by, for example, closing salad bars and buffets within cafeterias and kitchens, requiring individuals to sit at least six feet from one another, placing markings on the floor to allow social distancing while standing in line, offering boxed food via delivery or pick-up points, and reducing cash payments.
    5. Implement rotational shift schedules where possible (e.g., increasing the number of shifts, alternating days or weeks) to reduce the number of employees in the facility at the same time.
    6. Stagger meal and break times, as well as start times at each entrance, where possible.
    7. Install temporary physical barriers, where practicable, between workstations and cafeteria tables.
    8. Create protocols for minimizing personal contact upon delivery of materials to the facility.
    9. Adopt protocols to limit the sharing of tools and equipment to the maximum extent possible.
    10. Ensure there are sufficient hand-washing or hand-sanitizing stations at the worksite to enable easy access by employees, and discontinue use of hand dryers.
    11. Notify plant leaders and potentially exposed individuals upon identification of a positive case of COVID-19 in the facility, and maintain a central log for symptomatic employees or employees who received a positive test for COVID-19.
    12. Send potentially exposed individuals home upon identification of a positive case of COVID-19 in the facility.
    13. Require employees to self-report to plant leaders as soon as possible after developing symptoms of COVID-19.
    14. Shut areas of the manufacturing facility for cleaning and disinfection, as necessary, if an employee goes home because he or she is displaying symptoms of COVID-19.
  5. Research labs. Research laboratories, other than laboratories that perform diagnostic testing, must:
    1. Assign dedicated entry point(s) or times into lab buildings.
    2. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering a worksite, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with, if possible, a temperature screening.
    3. Create protocols or checklists as necessary to conform to the facility’s COVID-19 preparedness and response plan.
    4. Establish and implement a plan for distributing face coverings.
    5. Limit the number of people per square feet of floor space permitted in a particular laboratory at one time.
    6. Close open workspaces, cafeterias, and conference rooms.
    7. As necessary, use tape on the floor to demarcate socially distanced workspaces and to create one-way traffic flow.
    8. Require all office and dry lab work to be conducted remotely.
    9. Minimize the use of shared lab equipment and shared lab tools and create protocols for disinfecting lab equipment and lab tools.
    10. Provide disinfecting supplies and require employees to wipe down their work stations at least twice daily.
    11. Implement an audit and compliance procedure to ensure that cleaning criteria are followed.
    12. Establish a clear reporting process for any symptomatic individual or any individual with a confirmed case of COVID-19, including the notification of lab leaders and the maintenance of a central log.
    13. Clean and disinfect the work site when an employee is sent home with symptoms or with a confirmed case of COVID-19.
    14. Send any potentially exposed co-workers home if there is a positive case in the facility.
    15. Restrict all non-essential work travel, including in-person conference events.
  6. Retail, libraries, and museums. Retail stores that are open for in-store sales, as well as libraries and museums, must:
    1. Create communications material for customers (e.g., signs or pamphlets) to inform them of changes to store practices and to explain the precautions the store is taking to prevent infection.
    2. Establish lines to regulate entry in accordance with subsection (c) of this section, with markings for patrons to enable them to stand at least six feet apart from one another while waiting. Stores should also explore alternatives to lines, including allowing customers to wait in their cars for a text message or phone call, to enable social distancing and to accommodate seniors and those with disabilities.
    3. Except in Regions 6 and 8, adhere to the following restrictions:
      1. Stores of less than 50,000 square feet of customer floor space must limit the number of people in the store (including employees) to 25% of the total occupancy limits established by the State Fire Marshal or a local fire marshal.
      2. Stores of 50,000 square feet or more must:
        1. Limit the number of customers in the store at one time (excluding employees) to 20 people per 1,000 square feet of customer floor space.
        2. Create at least two hours per week of dedicated shopping time for vulnerable populations, which for purposes of this order are people over 60, pregnant women, and those with chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease.
      3. The director of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is authorized to issue an emergency order varying the capacity limits described in this subsection as necessary to protect the public health.
    4. Post signs at store entrances instructing customers of their legal obligation to wear a face covering when inside the store.
    5. Post signs at store entrances informing customers not to enter if they are or have recently been sick.
    6. Design spaces and store activities in a manner that encourages employees and customers to maintain six feet of distance from one another.
    7. Install physical barriers at checkout or other service points that require interaction, including plexiglass barriers, tape markers, or tables, as appropriate.
    8. Establish an enhanced cleaning and sanitizing protocol for high-touch areas like restrooms, credit-card machines, keypads, counters, shopping carts, and other surfaces.
    9. Train employees on:
      1. Appropriate cleaning procedures, including training for cashiers on cleaning between customers.
      2. How to manage symptomatic customers upon entry or in the store.
    10. Notify employees if the employer learns that an individual (including a customer or supplier) with a confirmed case of COVID-19 has visited the store.
  7. Offices. Offices must:
    1. Assign dedicated entry point(s) for all employees to reduce congestion at the main entrance.
    2. Provide visual indicators of appropriate spacing for employees outside the building in case of congestion.
    3. Take steps to reduce entry congestion and to ensure the effectiveness of screening (e.g., by staggering start times, adopting a rotational schedule in which only half of employees are in the office at a particular time).
    4. Increase distancing between employees by spreading out workspaces, staggering workspace usage, restricting non-essential common space (e.g., cafeterias), providing visual cues to guide movement and activity (e.g., restricting elevator capacity with markings).
    5. Prohibit social gatherings and meetings that do not allow for social distancing or that create unnecessary movement through the office. Use virtual meetings whenever possible.
    6. Provide disinfecting supplies and require employees wipe down their workstations at least twice daily.
    7. Post signs about the importance of personal hygiene.
    8. Disinfect high-touch surfaces in offices (e.g., whiteboard markers, restrooms, handles) and minimize shared items when possible (e.g., pens, remotes, whiteboards).
    9. Institute cleaning and communications protocols when employees are sent home with symptoms.
    10. Notify employees if the employer learns that an individual (including a customer, supplier, or visitor) with a confirmed case of COVID-19 has visited the office.
    11. Restrict all non-essential travel, including in-person conference events.
  8. Restaurants and bars. Restaurants and bars must:
    1. Limit capacity to 50% of normal seating.
    2. Require six feet of separation between parties or groups at different tables or bar tops (e.g., spread tables out, use every other table, remove or put up chairs or barstools that are not in use).
    3. Require patrons to wear a face covering except when seated at their table or bar top (unless the patron is unable medically to tolerate a face covering).
    4. Require patrons to remain seated at their tables or bar tops, except to enter or exit the premises, to order food, or to use the restroom.
    5. Sell alcoholic beverages only via table service, not via orders at the bar except to patrons seated at the bar.
    6. Prohibit access to common areas in which people can congregate, dance, or otherwise mingle.
    7. Create communications material for customers (e.g., signs, pamphlets) to inform them of changes to restaurant or bar practices and to explain the precautions that are being taken to prevent infection.
    8. Close waiting areas and ask customers to wait in cars whenever possible, or else outside the restaurant or bar, for a notification when their table is ready. Restaurants and bars should take measures to encourage social distancing among those customers waiting for tables who are not waiting in their cars.
    9. Close self-serve food or drink options, such as buffets, salad bars, and drink stations.
    10. Provide physical guides, such as tape on floors or sidewalks and signage on walls to ensure that customers remain at least six feet apart in any lines.
    11. Post signs at store entrances informing customers not to enter if they are or have recently been sick.
    12. Post signs instructing customers to wear face coverings until they are seated at their table.
    13. Require hosts, servers, and staff to wear face coverings in the dining area.
    14. Require employees to wear face coverings and gloves in the kitchen area when handling food, consistent with guidelines from the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”).
    15. Limit shared items for customers (e.g., condiments, menus) and clean high-contact areas after each customer (e.g., tables, chairs, menus, payment tools).
    16. Train employees on:
      1. Appropriate use of personal protective equipment in conjunction with food safety guidelines.
      2. Food safety health protocols (e.g., cleaning between customers, especially shared condiments).
      3. How to manage symptomatic customers upon entry or in the restaurant.
    17. Notify employees if the employer learns that an individual (including an employee, customer, or supplier) with a confirmed case of COVID-19 has visited the store.
    18. Close restaurant immediately if an employee shows symptoms of COVID-19, defined as either the new onset of cough or new onset of chest tightness or two of the following: fever (measured or subjective), chills, myalgia, headache, sore throat, or disorders of taste or smell, and perform a deep clean, consistent with guidance from the FDA and the CDC. Such cleaning may occur overnight.
    19. Install physical barriers, such as sneeze guards and partitions at cash registers, bars, host stands, and other areas where maintaining physical distance of six feet is difficult.
    20. To the maximum extent possible, limit the number of employees in shared spaces, including kitchens, host stands, break rooms, and offices, to maintain at least a six-foot distance between employees.
  9. Health care. Outpatient health-care facilities, including clinics, primary care physician offices, dental offices, and veterinary clinics, must:
    1. Post signs at entrance(s) instructing patients to wear a face covering when inside.
    2. Limit waiting-area occupancy to the number of individuals who can be present while staying six feet away from one another and ask patients, if possible, to wait in cars for their appointment to be called.
    3. Mark waiting rooms to enable six feet of social distancing (e.g., by placing X’s on the ground and/or removing seats in the waiting room).
    4. Enable contactless sign-in (e.g., sign in on phone app) as soon as practicable.
    5. Add special hours for highly vulnerable patients, including the elderly and those with chronic conditions.
    6. Conduct a common screening protocol for all patients, including a temperature check and questions about COVID-19 symptoms.
    7. Place hand sanitizer and face coverings at patient entrances.
    8. Require employees to make proper use of personal protective equipment in accordance with guidance from the CDC and OSHA.
    9. Require patients to wear a face covering when in the facility, except as necessary for identification or to facilitate an examination or procedure.
    10. Install physical barriers at sign-in, temperature screening, or other service points that normally require personal interaction (e.g., plexiglass, cardboard, tables).
    11. Employ telehealth and telemedicine to the greatest extent possible.
    12. Limit the number of appointments to maintain social distancing and allow adequate time between appointments for cleaning.
    13. Employ specialized procedures for patients with high temperatures or respiratory symptoms (e.g., special entrances, having them wait in their car) to avoid exposing other patients in the waiting room.
    14. Deep clean examination rooms after patients with respiratory symptoms and clean rooms between all patients.
    15. Establish procedures for building disinfection in accordance with CDC guidance if it is suspected that an employee or patient has COVID-19 or if there is a confirmed case.
  10. In-home services. All businesses or operations that provide in-home services, including cleaners, repair persons, painters, and the like, must:
    1. Require their employees (or, if a sole-owned business, the business owner) to perform a daily health screening prior to going to the job site.
    2. Maintain accurate appointment record, including date and time of service, name of client, and contact information, to aid with contact tracing.
    3. Limit direct interaction with customers by using electronic means of communication whenever possible.
    4. Prior to entering the home, inquire with the customer whether anyone in the household has been diagnosed with COVID-19, is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, or has had close contact with someone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19. If so, the business or operation must reschedule for a different time.
    5. Limit the number of employees inside a home to the minimum number necessary to perform the work in a timely fashion.
    6. Ensure that gloves are worn when practical and disposed of in accordance with guidance from the CDC.
  11. Personal-care services. All businesses or operations that provide barbering, cosmetology services, body art services (including tattooing and body piercing), tanning services, massage services, or similar personal-care services must:
    1. Maintain accurate appointment and walk-in records, including date and time of service, name of client, and contact information, to aid with contact tracing.
    2. Post signs at store entrances informing customers not to enter if they are or have recently been sick.
    3. Restrict entry to customers, to a caregiver of those customers, or to the minor dependents of those customers.
    4. Require in-use workstations to be separated by at least six feet from one another and, if feasible, separate workstations with physical barriers (e.g., plexiglass, strip curtains).
    5. Limit waiting-area occupancy to the number of individuals who can be present while staying six feet away from one another and ask customers, if possible, to wait in cars for their appointment to be called.
    6. Discontinue all self-service refreshments.
    7. Discard magazines in waiting areas and other non-essential, shared items that cannot be disinfected.
    8. Mark waiting areas to enable six feet of social distancing (e.g., by placing X’s on the ground and/or removing seats in the waiting room).
    9. Require employees to make proper use of personal protective equipment in accordance with guidance from the CDC and OSHA.
    10. Require employees and customers to wear a face covering at all times, except that customers may temporarily remove a face covering when receiving a service that requires its removal. During services that require a customer to remove their face covering, an employee must wear a face shield or goggles in addition to the face covering.
    11. Install physical barriers, such as sneeze guards and partitions at cash registers, where maintaining physical distance of six feet is difficult.
  12. Public accommodations. Sports and entertainment facilities, including arenas, cinemas, concert halls, performance venues, sporting venues, stadiums and theaters, as well as places of public amusement, such as amusement parks, arcades, bingo halls, bowling centers, skating rinks, and trampoline parks, must:
    1. Post signs outside of entrances informing customers not to enter if they are or have recently been sick.
    2. Maintain accurate records, including date and time of entry, names of patrons, and contact information, to aid with contact tracing; and deny entry to any visitor who does not provide at a minimum their name and phone number.
    3. Mandate wearing of facial coverings at all times while in the facility.
    4. Establish crowd-limiting measures to meter the flow of patrons (e.g., digital queuing, delineated waiting areas, parking instructions, social distance markings on ground or cones to designate social distancing, etc.).
    5. Use physical dividers, marked floors, signs, and other physical and visual cues to maintain six feet of distance between persons.
    6. Limit seating occupancy to the extent necessary to enable patrons not of the same household to maintain six feet of distance from others (e.g., stagger group seating upon reservation, close off every other row, etc.).
    7. For sports and entertainment facilities, establish safe exit procedures for patrons (e.g., dismiss groups based on ticket number, row, etc.).
    8. For sports and entertainment facilities, to the extent feasible, adopt specified entry and exit times for vulnerable populations, as well as specified entrances and exits.
    9. Train employees who interact with patrons (e.g., ushers) on how to:
      1. Monitor and enforce compliance with the facility’s COVID-19 protocols.
      2. Help patrons who become symptomatic.
    10. Frequently disinfect high-touch surfaces during events or, as necessary, throughout the day.
    11. Disinfect and deep clean the facility after each event or, as necessary, throughout the day.
    12. Close self-serve food or drink options, such as buffets, salad bars, and drink stations.
  13. Sports and exercise facilities. Gymnasiums, fitness centers, recreation centers, exercise facilities, exercise studios, bowling centers, roller rinks, ice rinks, and like facilities must:
    1. Use best efforts to provide opportunities for patrons to exercise outdoors.
    2. Maintain accurate records, including date and time of entry and exit, names of patrons, and contact information, to aid with contact tracing; and deny entry to any visitor who does not provide at a minimum their name and phone number.
    3. Mandate wearing of facial coverings at all times except when swimming.
    4. Limit capacity in the facility to 25% of the total occupancy limits established by the State Fire Marshal or a local fire marshal.
    5. Configure workout stations or implement protocols to enable six feet of distance between individuals during exercise sessions.
    6. Reduce class sizes, as necessary, to enable at least six feet of separation between individuals, and comply with relevant restrictions on social gatherings and organized events in Executive Order 2020-183, Safe Start, or any order that follows from it.
    7. Provide equipment-cleaning products throughout the facility for use on equipment.
    8. Make hand sanitizer, disinfecting wipes, soap and water, or similar disinfectant readily available.
    9. Regularly disinfect exercise equipment, including immediately after use. If patrons are expected to disinfect, post signs encouraging patrons to disinfect equipment.
    10. Ensure that ventilation systems operate properly.
    11. Increase introduction and circulation of outdoor air as much as possible by opening windows and doors, using fans, or other methods.
    12. Regularly clean and disinfect public areas, locker rooms, and restrooms.
    13. Close steam rooms, saunas, hot tubs, and cold plunge pools.
    14. Post signs outside of entrances instructing individuals not to enter if they are or have recently been sick.
  14. Pools. Swimming pools must:
    1. If they are outdoors, limit capacity to 50% of the bather capacity limits described in Rule 325.2193 of the Michigan Administrative Code.
    2. If they are indoors, limit capacity to 25% of the bather capacity limits described in Rule 325.2193 of the Michigan Administrative Code.
    3. Limit capacity on the pool deck to ensure that persons not part of the same household maintain six feet of distance from one another.
  15. Meat and poultry processing. Meat and poultry processing plants must:
    1. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering the facility, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with temperature screening.
    2. Create at least one dedicated entry point at every facility for daily screening as provided in subsection (a) of this section, and ensure physical barriers are in place to prevent anyone from bypassing the screening.
    3. Configure communal work environments so that employees are spaced at least six feet apart in all directions (e.g., side-to-side and when facing one another).
    4. Require employees to wear a face covering whenever present at the facility, except when removal is necessary to eat or drink.
    5. Provide clean cloth face coverings or disposable mask options for employees to use when the coverings become wet, soiled, or otherwise visibly contaminated over the course of a workday.
    6. Use face shields in addition to face coverings as necessary when engineering and administrative controls are difficult to maintain and there may be exposure to other workplace hazards, such as splashes or sprays of liquids on processing lines.
    7. Install physical barriers, such as strip curtains, plexiglass, or other impermeable dividers or partitions, to separate meat and poultry processing employees from each other.
    8. Take measures to ensure adequate ventilation in work areas to help minimize employees’ potential exposures.
    9. Encourage single-file movement with a six-foot distance between each employee through the facility.
    10. Stagger employees’ arrival, departure, break, and lunch times to avoid congregations of employees in parking areas, locker rooms, lunch areas, and near time clocks.
    11. Provide visual cues (e.g., floor markings, signs) as a reminder to employees to maintain social distancing.
    12. Designate employees to monitor and facilitate social distancing on the processing floor.
    13. Reduce processing capacity or modify the processing or production lines or stagger workers across shifts to minimize the number of employees in the facility at any one time.
    14. Adopt sick leave policies that discourage employees from entering the workplace while sick and modify any incentive programs that penalize employees for taking sick leave.
    15. Group employees together in cohorts, if feasible, in a manner that allows a group of employees to be assigned to the same shifts with the same coworkers, so as to minimize contacts between employees in each cohort.
    16. If an employee becomes or reports being sick, disinfect the workstation used and any tools handled by the employee.
    17. Provide personal protective equipment that is disposable if possible or else, if reusable equipment is provided, ensure proper disinfection and storage in a clean location when not in use.
  16. Casinos. Casinos must:
    1. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for customers, employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering the facility, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with temperature screening.
    2. Limit and enforce patron occupancy of 15% of total occupancy limits established by the State Fire Marshal or a local fire marshal.
    3. Designate entry points and exit points with extensive signage of the directional flow of patrons.
    4. Place signs at each entrance point, cage, and throughout the casino reminding patrons of CDC guidelines for social distancing practices, proper washing of hands, wearing face coverings, and to stay at home if feeling ill or sick.
    5. Require patrons to wear a face covering, except while eating or drinking or for identification purposes.
    6. Prohibit smoking indoors.
    7. Designate a Liaison Officer (or Officers), identify such Officer (or Officers) to all casino employees, and require any employee who believes they may have contracted COVID-19 or been exposed to COVID-19 to report this to an Officer.
    8. Stagger break schedules and employee starting and ending times to the extent possible to avoid congregation of individuals in back-of-house areas.
    9. Provide frequent opportunities for employees to wash and/or sanitize their hands to reduce the risk of surface transmission.
    10. In addition to the cleaning required under subsection 1(k), clean and disinfect all high-touch objects that are accessible to the public (e.g., ATMs, counters, door handles, elevator panels and buttons, restrooms, dining tables, employee break rooms, carts, chairs, table rails, trash bins, light switches, phones, kiosks, time clocks, etc.).
    11. Provide disinfecting wipes throughout the casino to enable patrons to disinfect frequently touched surfaces.
    12. Place hand sanitizer stations in high traffic areas, including throughout the casino floor and employee break rooms.
    13. Regularly maintain HVAC systems and maximize the delivery of fresh air into the facility.
    14. Frequently disinfect slot machines, provide wipe dispensaries for slot machines, and post signs encouraging patrons to wipe down slot machines before and after use.
    15. Enable social distancing between slot machines by either:
      1. Installing a plexiglass barrier between slot machines.
      2. Disabling machines or removing chairs from machines as necessary to maintain six feet of distance between machines in operation.
    16. Require employees and customers to wear face coverings while in the casino.
    17. Require casino employees who provide food and drink service on the casino floor to follow the rules described in section 8 of this order, which governs servers at restaurants, including but not limited to, the wearing of face coverings.
    18. Close the following services or offerings:
      1. Nightclubs.
      2. Valet service.
      3. Coat check.
      4. Self-serve buffets and self-serve soda and coffee stations.
    19. Follow any infection-control guidance provided by the Michigan Gaming Control Board, including, but not limited to, any guidance on the conduct of table games.
  17. Racetracks. In addition to following any other applicable rules, including the restrictions of Executive Order 2020-183, Safe Start, or any order that may follow from it, racetracks licensed by the Executive Director of the Michigan Gaming Control Board must follow all orders issued by the Executive Director for reopening and operation consistent with this order or any order that follows from it.
  18. Recordkeeping. Employers must maintain a record of the requirements set forth in subsections 1(c) (training), 1(f) (screening protocol), and 1(n) (required notifications).
  19. Effective date and effect on other orders. This order is effective immediately upon issuance. Executive Order 2020-175 is rescinded, except that nothing in this order shall be construed to affect any prosecution based on conduct that occurred before the effective date of this order. Section 2(d) of Executive Order 2020-153, Masks, is rescinded. Except as otherwise specified, nothing in this order supersedes any other executive order.
  20. Non-exclusivity. Nothing in this order shall be taken to limit or affect any rights or remedies otherwise available under law.
  21. Penalty. Consistent with MCL 10.33 and MCL 30.405(3), a willful violation of this order is a misdemeanor.

Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State of Michigan.