Michigan Workers

Michigan Workers

  • Michigan workers enjoy a wide variety of legal protections regarding issues at work. There are a number of state and federal statutes that protect their wages, safety, and well-being.

    This page includes several categories describing the type of protections available.

Protecting Workers

  • The State declared that the safety, health and general welfare of employees are primary public policy concerns. Since 1975, the Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Act has required Michigan employers to provide each employee a safe and healthful work environment free of recognized hazards. The Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration (MiOSHA) endeavors to protect Michigan’s workers through the fair enforcement of safety standards and rules, as well as through outreach training. 

    • Workers who believe that a health or safety hazard exists may contact the appropriate MiOSHA Division – either Construction Safety & Health or General Industry Safety & Health – to submit a complaint or other assistance.
    • A worker who submits a complaint regarding a potential health or safety hazard can choose to keep his or her identity confidential by indicating on the MiOSHA complaint form.

    The Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Act specifically prohibits an employer from discharging or discriminating against an employee who makes a safety-related complaint to MiOSHA. 

    The complaint must be filed within 30 days of the date of the alleged occurrence. A worker can contact or file a complaint concerning these issues at MiOSHA’s Detroit, Michigan, office.

Workers Compensation

  • Workers' disability compensation is an employee benefit that has been available to Michigan workers since 1912. Compensation is provided for employees who can demonstrate their disability or death is as a result of a work-related injury or disease. Benefits are paid by the employers (either directly or through their insurance company).

    These benefits are separate from unemployment compensation, hospital, health or accident insurance. The Department of Labor & Regulatory Affairs, Workers' Compensation Agency provides oversight for workers' disability compensation programs.

    Private employers in Michigan who employ three or more workers at one time; or have regularly employed at least one worker for 35 hours or more per week for 13 weeks or longer during the last 52 weeks must have workers' disability compensation coverage, either as a self-insured or through an insurance company.

Unemployment Insurance Benefit Information

  • unemployment line of shadows of people lined up against a red brick wall

  • Unemployment Insurance provides temporary income replacement to workers who become unemployed through no fault of their own. The benefits are paid from the Unemployment Trust Fund which is administered in Michigan by the Unemployment Insurance Agency (UIA) of the Department of Talent & Economic Development. The Unemployment Trust Fund is derived from state unemployment taxes or reimbursements paid by employers. Workers do not pay anything into the Unemployment Trust Fund.

    Benefits are paid to workers who have had sufficient qualifying wages as required by the Michigan Employment Security Act. There are other reasons for disqualification, including workers who quit their jobs or are fired for misconduct. While drawing benefits, workers are required to be making every effort to find full-time, suitable work. Workers whose wages are reduced may be regarded as "underemployed" and entitled to some unemployment benefits, even though continuing to work at reduced wages.

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Bureau of Construction Codes

  • The Bureau of Construction Codes works to assure that the built environment and the systems within are sound, safe and sanitary and that building users' health, safety and welfare are protected through a coordinated program of code compliance, investigation and training and the consistent application of standards. 

    A person who has complaints concerning the various aspects of code compliance and the licensing and credentialing of individuals working with the applicable codes may be reached via the Bureau of Construction Codes Divisions.

Licensing and Complaints

  • The Licensing and Complaints Division is responsible for handling a broad spectrum of construction code and licensing complaints.

    They can address questions and concerns involving:

    • Complaints against boiler, electrical, mechanical and plumbing licensees;
    • Complaints against local units of government relating to the administration and enforcement of construction codes performed by the local unit of government;
    • Complaints against Mobile Home Communities.
    • Questions regarding eligibility of examinees, licensure and registration issuance, and renewals of registration of licenses.
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