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Radon Mitigation Study

Contact

Les Smith
Radon@Michigan.gov
800-723-6642 (800-RADONGAS)

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Environment's (EGLE's) Indoor Radon Program, in partnership with the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists (AARST), is commencing a study of radon mitigation systems installed throughout the State of Michigan.

 

A radon mitigation system located on the exterior of a home.

Radon Mitigation Study

EGLE’s Indoor Radon Program is seeking homeowners with a radon mitigation system for voluntary participation in the radon mitigation system study. Radon is a serious health hazard, and we applaud Michigan homeowners’ efforts to keep their family’s safe and their homes healthy. The goal of this study is to survey existing mitigation systems installed in the state for radon mitigation effectiveness and overall build quality as compared to the current AARST mitigation standards.

Study Sign Up

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about this Study

Printable Version

  • Radon mitigation is any process or system used to reduce radon concentrations in buildings. The goal of a radon mitigation system is to reduce the indoor radon level as low as reasonably achievable. Radon mitigation systems should reduce radon below the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) action level of 4 picocuries per liter of air (pCi/L). A quality radon mitigation system may reduce year-round levels to below 2 pCi/L.

    An active radon mitigation system consists of PVC pipe, (looks like plumbing pipe), a label containing information about the system and the installer, monitoring devices such as a U-Tube manometer and possibly an alarm, and a fan used to exhaust radon gas outdoors. The radon fan can be found on the home's exterior, or in the attic. The piping for a radon system usually starts in the lowest level of the home and is routed outdoors to the fan and exhausts above the roof edge.

    A passive radon mitigation system does not have a fan. These systems are in newly constructed homes in some areas of the state. Passive radon system piping also starts at the lowest level of the home and is routed through the home's interior and exhausts above the roof. Passive radon mitigation system piping may be visible in a home's basement or attic. There should be labeling on the pipe identifying it as part of a radon mitigation system. Note that a passive radon system can be activated by adding a fan. The radon fan would be installed in the attic.

    For more information about radon mitigation systems, please visit www.Michigan.gov/radon.

  • The purpose of the study is to determine radon mitigation effectiveness and overall build quality throughout the state. The radon mitigation system will be evaluated using the current national voluntary consensus standard: Soil Gas Mitigation Standards for Existing Homes.

  • To participate in this voluntary study, you must be the current homeowner and must occupy the home where the radon mitigation system is located. The selection process will prioritize homes with radon mitigation systems installed within the last 5 years. Efforts will be made to have a representative sample size across the state and include as many mitigators as possible. If you are the homeowner and are interested in having your radon mitigation system inspected free of charge, please sign up for the Radon Mitigation Study.

     

  • For this study, the only systems evaluated will be radon systems installed by radon mitigation contractors. Do-It-Yourself (DIY) radon mitigation systems will not be evaluated in this study.

  • The State of Michigan currently does not license, certify, or regulate radon professionals, or the mitigation systems they install. However, The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE), encourages the use of radon professionals who have been certified by the National Radon Safety Board (NRSB), or the National Radon Proficiency Program (NRPP) administered by the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists (AARST). Both certification bodies are recognized by the USEPA.

  • No. The radon mitigation system inspections will be conducted in homes provided voluntarily by homeowners who want to have their system inspected free of charge. The system must have been installed by a radon mitigation contractor. DIY radon mitigation systems will not be evaluated in this study. If you are interested in having your radon mitigation system inspected free of charge, please sign up for the Radon Mitigation Study.

  • The radon mitigation system will be reviewed by a certified Soil Gas Mitigation Compliance Inspector selected by AARST, in partnership with EGLE. The AARST contractor(s) will review the mitigation system and generate a report for each inspection.

  • Radon mitigation systems will be randomly selected for this study. Once selected, EGLE or it's contractor, will contact you to obtain additional information, explain what to expect during the onsite review, and set up an appointment.

  • There are a couple of options.

    First, review the radon mitigation system label (found on the vertical system pipe) to find the name and contact information of the system installer.
    If the information is not included on the label, contact EGLE's Indoor Radon Program at 1-800-723-6642 by phone, or by email at Radon@Michigan.gov, for a list of certified radon contractors operating within the state of Michigan.

  • Yes. Participation in this program is strictly voluntary. Inspection findings will be shared with the homeowner. In the event deficiencies are observed, it is the sole responsibility of the homeowner to resolve any issues. EGLE will not pursue enforcement for correction of deficiencies on the behalf of the homeowner. EGLE may share critical deficiencies, which could cause immediate harm, with local code enforcement officials. The scope of this program is limited only to the home's radon mitigation system. Permitting EGLE to perform this inspection does not obligate EGLE to repair a home's radon mitigation system or take any other action to address deficiencies identified.

  • In the event deficiencies are observed, it is the sole responsibility of the homeowner to resolve any issues with the radon mitigation system installer. EGLE will not pursue enforcement for correction of deficiencies on the behalf of the homeowner.

  • Please contact EGLE's Indoor Radon Program at 1-800-723-6642 by phone, or Radon@Michigan.gov by e-mail for a list of certified radon contractors operating within the state of Michigan.

  • No. The radon mitigation system study will be conducted in homes provided voluntarily by homeowners who want to have their system evaluated free of charge. Radon mitigation systems will be evaluated regardless of the installer's certification status. However, DIY radon mitigation systems will not be evaluated during this study. Findings from the study will be used to develop training for all radon mitigation system installers.

  • Yes, absolutely. Please work directly with your customers about volunteering their radon mitigation system for inspection. If your customers are interested in participating, they may sign up for the Radon Mitigation Study.

  • Results from the study will be shared with the homeowner and the radon mitigation system installer, if known. The results will not be shared with other radon mitigation contractors. Once the radon mitigation system study is completed, an anonymized summary of issues (e.g., percentage of radon systems with inadequate labeling), will be shared with all radon professionals and will be used for the development of specific radon mitigation training and continuing education.

  • Questions about participation in this voluntary radon mitigation system study can be directed to Les Smith, III, Indoor Radon Specialist, Radiological Protection Section, Materials Management Division, EGLE, by phone at 517-388-6913 or by e-mail at Radon@Michigan.gov.

Participation in this program is strictly voluntary. Inspection findings will be shared with the homeowner. In the event deficiencies are observed, it is the sole responsibility of the homeowner to resolve any issues. EGLE will not pursue enforcement for correction of deficiencies on the behalf of the homeowner. EGLE may share critical deficiencies, which could cause immediate harm, with local code enforcement officials. The scope of this program is limited only to the home's radon mitigation system. Permitting EGLE to perform this inspection does not obligate EGLE to repair a home's radon mitigation system or take any other action to address deficiencies identified.