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MPART PFAS Geographic Information System

An overview of Michigan's upper peninsula, with various symbols overlaid
Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy

MPART PFAS Geographic Information System

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a large group of man-made chemicals that include perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). PFAS have been used globally during the past century in manufacturing, firefighting and thousands of common household and other consumer products. These chemicals are persistent in the environment and in the human body – meaning they don’t break down and they can accumulate over time. In recent years, experts have become increasingly concerned by the potential effects of high concentrations of PFAS on human health.

MPART stands for the Michigan PFAS Action Response Team (MPART).

MPART PFAS Geographic Information System

This app features several datasets as part of Michigan PFAS Action Response Team (MPART)'s efforts:

  1. PFAS Sites (official list of PFAS sites in Michigan)
  2. PFAS Surface Water Sampling (PFAS concentrations in surface water samples collected by EGLE), and
  3. Statewide Testing Initiative of Public Water Supplies Hexbins and Results Table (PFAS concentrations in municipal drinking water samples collected by AECOM)

Call our Environmental Assistance Center at 800-662-9278 for assistance with reading or interpreting this map.

Open the MPART GIS application

Questions about the system

  • The Michigan PFAS Sites layer is the official list of PFAS sites in Michigan. This data is updated as new PFAS sites are encountered. 


    As of March 2021, a PFAS site is defined as a property where EGLE has a valid groundwater monitoring well sample result that exceeds one or more of Michigan's seven PFAS groundwater cleanup criteria, and based on data, EGLE has determined the property is the location of the source of PFAS contamination (e.g., fire training area where PFAS-containing foam was used).

  • PFAS concentrations (listed in parts per trillion) in surface water samples collected by EGLE’s Water Resources Division in Michigan. This data is static and was last pulled on September 13, 2021.
    • Surface water samples analyzed for PFAS are collected through EGLE’s Water Chemistry Monitoring Program and watershed/source tracking investigations. To learn more about EGLE’s effort in sampling lakes and streams for PFAS visit the MPART PFAS Sampling in Lakes & Streams website.

    • Surface water contaminant concentrations are compared against Michigan’s Water Quality Standards. Michigan has derived Part 4 Rule 57 water quality values for two PFAS: Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). The Human Noncancer Value (HNV) for PFOS is 11 parts per trillion (ppt) for surface waters used as a drinking water source and 12 ppt for all other water bodies. The PFOA HNV is 420 ppt for surface waters used as a drinking water source and 12,000 ppt for all other water bodies.

    • Contaminant data often include flags, also known as qualifiers, which are notes attached to data that gives detailed information about that particular result. In the surface water PFAS data layer, PFAS analytes associated with a “K” flag were not detected in the sample and therefore the method detection limit (MDL) is displayed. “J” flagged results indicates an estimated concentration as the result is above the MDL but below the laboratory reporting limit.

    • The number of PFAS analytes EGLE analyzes in surface water samples has increased over the years. EGLE is currently analyzing for 29 PFAS analytes in surface water samples. In the surface water PFAS data layer, if a flag is listed as “Not Measured”, that particular PFAS analyte was not included in the analysis for that sample.

    • Questions regarding the surface water PFAS data can be directed to Dr. Brandon Armstrong (ArmstrongB5@Michigan.gov).
  • The data includes information on the State of Michigan funded drinking water Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) sampling effort, including, but not limited to, sample location, sample date, sample results, etc. There are two data sets associated with this:

    1. a hexbins layer (hexagons are 3 miles in height) showing the general location of all samples and
    2. a results table showing the sample results. This data is static and was last pulled October 29, 2021.
    • The data comes from Architecture, Engineering, Construction, Operations, and Management (AECOM) (State of Michigan contractor) who are collecting and submitting the samples to certified drinking water PFAS laboratories. The data was collected using AECOM’s Environmental Quality Information System (EQuIS) database tools.

    • The data represents the PFAS sample locations, with each location having multiple samples taken, dates for each sample, and the analytical results for each sample. These analytical results include detections for 14 – 28 PFAS analytes, depending on the analytical method used. Each result has a "flags" column that corresponds to important data qualifiers.

      • Understanding the flags: Contaminant data often include flags, also known as qualifiers, which are notes attached to data that gives detailed information about that particular result. In the drinking water PFAS data layer, PFAS analytes associated with a “U” flag were not detected in the sample and therefore a null value is displayed. “J” flagged results indicates an estimated concentration as the result is above the minimum detection limit (MDL) but below the laboratory reporting limit.  “J-“ flagged results indicates an estimated concentration as the result is above the minimum MDL, below the laboratory reporting limit, but biased low.  “UJ” flagged results indicates a not detected at the value estimated reporting limit.  “R” flagged results indicates a rejected sample as serious quality control issues render the result value bot usable.  “*” flagged results indicates that the result values have not been verified.

    • The locations that have been sampled in this effort include Community Water Supplies (including regional and municipal water supplies, manufactured housing communities, residential apartment buildings, etc.), Nontransient Noncommunity Water Supplies (including schools, businesses, childcare providers, Michigan Head Start locations, motels, resorts, etc.), and Transient Noncommunity Water Supplies (children’s camps and medical care providers).

      • Understanding the "SystemType" field: See table below. Non-community water supplies are considered "Type I" (serves 25+ people 6 months out of the year) and Community water supplies are considered "Type II" (serves 25+ people year-round).

        • ADFSTC: Non-Community Water Supply (Adult Foster Care Provider)
        • CHLCMP: Non-Community Water Supply (Children's Camp)
        • DAYCARE: Non-Community Water Supply (Child Care Provider)
        • INDUS: Non-Community Water Supply (Industry)
        • MEDCAR: Non-Community Water Supply (Medical Care Provider)
        • MOTEL: Non-Community Water Supply (Hotel or Motel)
        • MUN: Community Water Supply (for example Municipal Supply, Apartment, Nursing Home, Prison, etc.

    • This contains one hexbins layer (3 miles in height) showing the general location of the water sampling. The hexbins were created by EGLE using ArcGIS Online's Aggregate Points tool. The layer contains one field called "Hexagon ID" that connects the general location with the results of samples found within the hexbin area. The results are found in a related table "Statewide Testing Initiative of Public Water Supplies Sampling Results". There is no precise location attached to the results for security. However, the table does contain a field "Hexagon ID" that connects the the result with the general location symbolized by the hexagon layer. 

    • Questions regarding the drinking water sampling PFAS data can be directed to Lisa Dygert (DygertL@Michigan.gov).