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How does water get to my home?

A person filling a black metal water bottle at a kitchen sink
Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy

How does water get to my home?

Water is supplied to your home from either a public water supply or a private well. It’s important to determine how your water is supplied in order to understand how your water quality is monitored and who to contact if you have water quality concerns.

A general rule to follow is if you get a bill for your water, you are likely on a community water supply.

Once you’ve determine how water is supplied to your home then you can contact the appropriate agency if you have water quality questions or concerns. Feel free to reach out to EGLE if you experience issues resolving your concern with your local water supplier at EGLE-CleanWater@Michigan.gov

Community Water Supplies

Residents who receive their water from a community water supplier, should contact the agency listed on your water bill if you have water quality questions or concerns. You can also use the directories below to help you find your water supplier.

Got a few minutes? Check out Michigan.gov/EGLECommunityWater to learn more about Michigan’s Safe Drinking Water Act and how the community water supply program helps protect over 1,400 community public water supplies in Michigan.

Need help finding your supply? 

  • Michigan Community Water Supplies (by county)
  • Michigan Community Water Supplies (alphabetical)
  • List of local water suppliers
Learn how water travels from a local community water supply through a home and to its faucets. 

MI EnviroMinute: Community Water Supplies

Learn how water travels from a local community water supply through a home and to its faucets. 

Private Household Wells

If your water is supplied by a private well, contact your local health department. You can find their phone number at MALPH.org.

MI EnviroMinute: Well Water Video

MI EnviroMinute: Well Water

Learn about how a water well pulls water from deep in the ground and pumps it into your home to your faucet.

What are the different types of water supplies?

A Type 1 Community Water Supply; multiple homes and businesses showing pipes coming from each building and going to a central location

Type 1: Community Public Water Supply

Provides water to at least 25 residents or 15 living units year-round.

  • Some examples are municipalities (cities, towns, etc.), apartments, nursing homes. and
    manufactured housing communities.
  • The water is pumped from surface water (lakes, rivers) or groundwater using
    water wells.
A Type 2 Non-Transient Non-Community water supply; a school showing a pipe going to a private well

Type 2: Non-Transient Non-Community Public Water Supply

Provides water to at least 25 of the same people for at least six months or more a year, but not for year-round residential living.

  • Some examples are schools, daycares, and office buildings that have their own water system.
  • Water is typically pumped from groundwater using water wells. 
A Type 2 Transient Non-Community water supply; a shop showing a pipe going to a private well

Type 2: Transient Non-Community Public Water Supply

Provides water to at least 25 people for at least 60 days a year, but does not serve the same 25 people for more than six months of the year. 

  • Some examples are hotels, restaurants, campgrounds, gas stations, and churches
  • Water is typically pumped from groundwater using water wells
A Type 3 water supply; a multi-family home showing pipes going to each unit to a private well

Type 3: Public Water Supply

All other public water supplies that provide drinking water not considered a Type 1 or Type 2 are considered a Type 3. 

  • Some examples are small apartment complexes or condominiums, duplexes, and very small businesses. Ownership of multiple Type 3 wells may change the drinking water supply type.
  • Water is pumped from groundwater using water wells. 
A residential home showing a pipe going from a private well to the home

Private Residential Well

Provides water to a single-family residential home. Water is pumped from groundwater using a water well.