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FAQ: Climate Pollution Reduction Grants

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Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy

FAQ: Climate Pollution Reduction Grants

This document serves as a guide to understand the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) new $5 billion Climate Pollution Reduction Grants (CPRG) Program and the State of Michigan’s response and coordination.

Established in the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA), the CPRG Program will award funds to state and local governments to develop and implement climate action plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The CPRG Program is split into two phases:

  • Phase I: Planning Grants
  • Phase II: Implementation Grants

You will find answers to frequently asked questions below. Not seeing your question?

Please contact the Office of Climate and Energy at EGLE-OCE@Michigan.gov for more information.

Download the Printable FAQ

  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Climate Pollution Reduction Grants (CPRG) program provides states, local governments, and tribal nations flexible resources to plan for and pursue ambitious greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution reductions to achieve three broad objectives:

    1. Tackle damaging climate pollution while supporting the creation of good jobs and lowering energy costs for families;
    2. Accelerate work to address environmental injustices and empower community-driven solutions in overburdened neighborhoods; and,
    3. Deliver cleaner air by reducing harmful pollution in places where people live, work, play, and go to school.

    Through the Climate Pollution Reduction Grants program, the State of Michigan has received a $3 million planning grant that the Office of Climate and Energy will use to refine and implement the MI Healthy Climate Plan and prepare Michigan communities to compete in nationwide competitive federal funding competitions. In addition to state level CPRG funding, the U. S. EPA has directly awarded $1 million to each of the 67 most populous metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in the country – including Grand Rapids-Kentwood and Detroit-Warren-Dearborn. The state of Michigan is closely collaborating with Grand Valley Metro Council, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, and federally recognized tribes to streamline development and bring home as many federal dollars as possible.

  • The CPRG is broken into two phases – the timeline for Phase I: Planning Grants is provided below.

    For States, Municipalities, and Air Pollution Control Agencies:

    May 2023 – March 2024 Develop Priority Climate Action Plan (PCAP)
    April 2024 – July 2025 Develop Comprehensive Climate Action Plan (CCAP)
    July 2025 – September 2027 Develop Status Report

    For Tribes and Territories:

    May 2023 – March 2024 Develop Priority Climate Action Plan (PCAP)
    April 2024 – July 2025 Develop Comprehensive Climate Action Plan (CCAP)

    The timeline for Phase II: Competitive Implementation Grants is provided below.

    September 2023 Implementation Grant Competition Issued
    February 1, 2024 Optional, non-binding Notice of Intent to Apply due
    March 1, 2024 Priority Climate Action Plans due
    April 1, 2024 General Competition Applications due
    May 1, 2024 Tribal Competition Applications due
    July 2024 Notice of Funding Selection for General Competition
    September 2024 Notice of Funding Selection for Tribal Competition

    Please see the corresponding sections for more detail on some of the individual deliverables.

  • Priority Climate Action Plan

    The Priority Climate Action Plan (PCAP) is a narrative report due on March 1, 2024, that includes a focused list of near-term, high-priority, implementation-ready measures to reduce GHG pollution and an analysis of GHG emissions reductions that would be achieved through implementation. These initial plans can focus on a specific sector or selected sectors and do not need to comprehensively address all sources of GHG emissions and sinks in the jurisdiction. Michigan’s PCAP will leverage the stakeholder engagement and prioritization process that went into the development of the MHCP and work across various coordinating entities and stakeholder groups to identify and source real, implementable climate pollution reduction actions. The PCAP is required to include: 

    • A simplified GHG inventory;
    • Quantified GHG reduction measures;
    • A low-income and disadvantaged communities benefits analysis; and,
    • A review of authority to implement.

    The State of Michigan is aiming to include the following elements in addition to what is required by the EPA:

    • A summary of Michigan’s existing GHG reduction targets and any necessary refinement, building from Michigan’s commitment to reach 50-52% emissions reductions by 2030 and carbon neutrality economywide by 2050.
    • A selective evaluation of the intersection of PCAP and MHCP priorities with other federal funding availability, leveraging Michigan’s existing work through the Michigan Infrastructure Office.
    • A workforce analysis if it is necessary to the successful prioritization of actions in the PCAP.
    Planning grant recipients are encouraged, but not required, to include additional analyses in their PCAP, such as GHG emissions projections, GHG reduction targets, a benefits analysis (for the full geographic scope and population covered by the plan), a plan for leveraging other federal funding, and a workforce planning analysis. A PCAP may draw from or reference an existing climate action plan or plans for the geographic area covered, such as an existing state climate, energy, or sustainability plan.

    As part of he PCAP development process, the State of Michigan is planning virtual and in-person listening sessions to receive input from communities across Michigan, especially low-income areas that are typically hit 'first and worst' by climate impacts.

    Comprehensive Climate Action Plan

    The Comprehensive Climate Action Plan (CCAP) is due 2 years from the date of award of the planning grant (mid-2025). The CCAP should touch on all significant GHG sources/sinks and sectors present in a state or metropolitan area, establish near-term and long-term GHG emission reduction goals, and provide strategies and identify measures to achieve those goals. Each CCAP must include:

    • A comprehensive GHG inventory;
    • GHG emissions projections;
    • GHG reduction targets;
    • Quantified GHG reduction measures;
    • A benefits analysis for the full geographic scope and population covered by the plan;
    • A low-income and disadvantaged communities benefits analysis;
    • A review of authority to implement;
    • A plan to leverage other federal funding; and,
    • A workforce planning analysis.

    All planning grant recipients will be expected to conduct a comprehensive climate action plan development process. Jurisdictions with existing climate plans may use planning grant funds to update or expand their existing plans to reflect, for example, recent changes in technologies and market forces, potential leveraging of other funding opportunities (e.g., under the Inflation Reduction Act, Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, or other sources), new program areas and opportunities for regional collaboration, or inclusion of analyses to estimate benefits including those flowing to low income and disadvantaged communities. Grantees with previously developed climate action plans will be able to integrate their previous planning experience into the CCAP.

  • State Level

    The State of Michigan designated the Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy, specifically the Office of Climate and Energy, with oversight and responsibility for managing grant funds and coordinating activities and deliverables pertaining to the CPRG Planning Grant program. 

    Regional Level

    In addition to state level CPRG funding, the EPA has directly awarded $1 million to each of the 67 most populous metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in the country. In Michigan, this applies to the Grand Rapids-Kentwood and Detroit-Warren-Dearborn areas. 

    MSA Lead Entity About Lead Entity Award Amount
    Detroit-Warren-Dearborn Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) SEMCOG supports local planning through its technical, data, and intergovernmental resources. The work SEMCOG does improves the quality of the region's water, makes the transportation system safer and more efficient, revitalizes communities, and spurs economic development. 1 million
    Grand Rapids-Kentwood Grand Valley Metropolitan Council (GVMC) GVMC is an alliance of governmental units in the West Michigan area that are appointed to plan for the growth and development, improve the quality of the community's life, and coordinate governmental services. 1 million

    Tribal Level

    In addition to state and MSA-level CPRD funding, the EPA has directly awarded a variety of funding to five federally recognized tribes and tribal consortium across Michigan.

    The State of Michigan is already coordinating efforts with other lead entities, SEMCOG, GVMC, and the aforementioned federally recognized tribal nations and consortium, as well as with other regional partners who are not directly receiving funding from the EPA.

    Other Partners

    The State of Michigan is also collaborating with the following entities throughout the CPRG process, in addition to others as they’re identified.

    Local Governments: The State of Michigan is aligning with other local governments through EGLE’s Catalyst Communities initiative and Michigan Green Communities, a statewide network of local government staff and officials that collaborate with one another through peer learning and information sharing to promote innovative sustainability solutions at the local, regional, and state level.

    The Council on Climate Solutions: The Council on Climate Solutions was created by Executive Order 2020-182, and functions as an advisory body that provides advice on the development and implementation of MI Healthy Climate Plan. Each meeting is open to the public, recorded, and posted with meeting materials on the Council’s webpage. Quarterly updates are provided to the Council on the status of MHCP implementation, and guest speakers are often invited to focus on specific topic areas. 

    The Michigan Advisory Council on Environmental Justice: The Michigan Advisory Council on Environmental Justice (MAC-EJ) is the state’s first Environmental Justice advisory council. Members represent an intentional combination of frontline activists, advocacy organizations, academia, tribal representation, local governments, business and industry, public health, and labor. The MAC-EJ is an advisory body for Environmental Justice actions spearheaded by the Interagency Environmental Justice Response Team and the Office of Environmental Justice Public Advocate. 

    The Michigan Council on Future Mobility and Electrification: The Michigan Council on Future Mobility and Electrification (CFME) is an advisory body tasked with developing and recommending policies and actions that will help keep Michigan a global mobility leader as we maneuver to the mobility sector’s next era. Its areas of focus include automated and connected vehicle technologies, intelligent transportation systems, mobility innovation, electric and other low- and no-emission vehicles and related infrastructure; as well as issues related to economic development, talent attraction, and workforce training. 

    State of Michigan Cross-Department CPRG Sprint Team: Per the EPA’s current guidance on the CPRG, the OCE is working on convening regular meetings and establishing consistent coordination between a variety of Departments across the State of Michigan to leverage as much knowledge and expertise as possible. Members of the CPRG Sprint Team will include leadership voices from Governor Whitmer’s office, including the Michigan Infrastructure Office (MIO), and various state departments, including EGLE; DNR; the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD); LEO; the Treasury; MDOT; the Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS); and the MPSC.

    Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy Climate Liaisons: The EGLE Climate Liaisons is a program focused on more effectively integrating climate-related work, policies, and programs into day-to-day operations. This group is comprised of at least one representative from each Division and Office within EGLE.

  • Frontline communities are considered and included in all aspects of the SOM’s CPRG application. EGLE’s Office of Climate and Energy and Office of Environmental Justice Public Advocate are partnering closely to identify how capacity and resources associated with the CPRG will benefit frontline communities in both process and outcomes.

    Engagement

    Michigan believes that community-based organizations (CBOs) and place-based networks are a critical part of equitable engagement and essential for reaching frontline and disadvantaged communities in the face of the climate crisis. The State of Michigan is aiming to partner with trusted community venues to host a variety of stakeholder engagement events, including public listening sessions. 

    We recommend signing up for the Michigan Climate Action News and Updates listserv to stay updated on engagement opportunities as they becomes available.

    Potential Outcomes

    The term “outcome” in the CPRG means the result, effect, or consequence that will occur from carrying out an environmental program or activity that is related to an environmental or programmatic goal or objective. Outcomes may be environmental, behavioral, health-related or programmatic in nature, but should also be quantitative.

    Expected outcomes from the projects to be funded should include, but are not limited to: 

    • Tons of pollution (GHGs and co-pollutants) reduced over the lifetime of the measures identified in the PCAP and the CCAP;
    • Tons of pollution (GHGs and co-pollutants) reduced annually; and,
    • Tons of pollution (GHGs and co-pollutants) reduced with respect to low-income and disadvantaged communities.

    Other potential outcomes may include, but are not limited to:

    • Improved staff capacity to implement policies to address climate change;
    • Enhanced community engagement;
    • Improved ambient air quality;
    • Health benefits achieved;
    • Increased public awareness of project and results; and/or,
    • Creation of high-quality jobs with an emphasis on workers from underserved populations.
  • The State of Michigan has proposed a budget that includes some funding set aside for municipal, tribal, and community-based subawards. As of now, we are still in the planning process for how and when this funding will be deployed.

    Local governments are encouraged to apply for funding, either individually or as part of a coalition of eligible entities, under the competitive implementation grant program of the CPRG. For more information on eligible applicants, timelines, and other information, please see the “Competitive Implementation Grants” section of this webpage.

    We recommend signing up for the Michigan Climate Action News & Updates listserv to stay updated on funding opportunities as they become available.

  • In June 2023, the State of Michigan received a $3 million planning grant from the EPA to develop a Priority Climate Action Plan (PCAP) as part of the first phase of the Climate Pollution Reduction Grants program. Two Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Grand Rapids-Kentwood and Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, also received planning grants in the amount of $1 million each to develop regional PCAPs. The organizations leading the development of these regional PCAPs are Grand Valley Metro Council (GVMC) and the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG), respectively. GVMC’s PCAP will cover the counties of Ionia, Kent, Montcalm, and Ottawa, while SEMCOG’s PCAP will cover the counties of Lapeer, St. Clair, Macomb, Oakland, Livingston, Wayne, Monroe, and Washtenaw. The State of Michigan’s PCAP will cover the entire state.

  • The PCAP and the CCAP are directly tied to each other with key differences outlined below: 

    Element PCAP CCAP
    Timeline May 2023 - March 2024 April 2024 - July 2025
    Focus

    The PCAP covers the geographic areas of the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of Michigan and is anticipated to target reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the following key sectors, identified as priorities in the MI Healthy Climate Plan (MHCP):

    • Electricity Generation
    • Commercial and Residential Buildings
    • Transportation
    • Industry

    The CCAP covers the geographic areas of the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of Michigan and further targeting reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the following sectors, in addition to those identified in the PCAP:

    • Agriculture
    • Land Use, Land Use Change, and Forestry
    • Solid Waste and Wastewater
    Emission Goals Maximizing emissions reductions between now and 2030, to meet the interim targets laid out in the MHCP of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 50-52% by 2030 economywide and ultimately achieve carbon neutrality by 2050. Same as PCAP.
    Process and Engagement The PCAP is building from the MI Healthy Climate Plan, which had a robust stakeholder engagement process. The Plan was developed by EGLE with input from hundreds of Michigan residents. Learn more about the plan and engagement process here. A variety of virtual and in-person regional and sector-specific input sessions will be held, along with webinars and other opportunities for public feedback as they are identified.
    Same as PCAP, with new focuses on the sectors not previously included in the PCAP.
    Outcomes
    • Reduction of GHG emissions statewide in accordance with the goals of the MI Healthy Climate Plan.
    • Improved understanding of statewide GHG emission sources, projections of statewide GHG emissions, air quality (especially in low-income and disadvantaged communities), and health and related co-benefits (especially in low-income and disadvantaged communities).
    • Increased climate resilience and public awareness of projects, funding opportunities, and results.
    • Creation of high-quality jobs.
    • Enhanced community engagement practices.
    Same as PCAP.

  • It’s anticipated that the State of Michigan’s PCAP will focus on the electricity, buildings, transportation, and industry sectors as those have previously been identified as having the most potential for emissions reductions, especially in the short term. However, this has not been finalized and will also be directly informed by feedback and input from a variety of stakeholder and community engagement opportunities.

  • The State of Michigan will be holding a series of regional and sector-specific engagement sessions, both in-person and virtually to receive feedback and input on what should be included in the PCAP. We also plan to partner with other planning grant recipients, as well as trusted community groups and organizations wherever possible to ensure representation and diversity of feedback. To be informed of upcoming stakeholder engagement opportunities, as well as be notified of upcoming informational webinars, please sign up for the Michigan Climate Action News & Updates email listserv.

  • The EPA defines eligible entities as lead organizations that were direct recipients of CPRG planning grants, as well as other state, municipal, tribal, and territorial entities that seek to implement GHG reduction measures included in an applicable PCAP.

    Eligible entities may apply as lead applicants on no more than two applications – one individual, and one as lead as part of a coalition. However, there is no limit to the number of applications on which eligible entities may appear as non-lead. For this grant program, a coalition is defined as a group of two or more eligible entities that share a strong and substantial commitment to the proposed measures (e.g., financially, materially, or operationally) such that withdrawal by any single member from the coalition would fundamentally alter the design or expected outputs and outcomes of the proposed measures.

     

     
  • Only applications that seek to implement GHG reduction measures that are included in an applicable PCAP are eligible for funding under this funding competition.

    The EPA anticipates that applications may seek funding for the following types of measures: 

    • A new, stand-alone GHG reduction measure that will be implemented solely through CPRG funding;
    • An expansion of a GHG reduction measure that is already being implemented, where the expansion of the measure will be funded through CPRG funding; and,
    • A new GHG reduction measure for which the applicant has already secured partial funding and needs additional funding from the CPRG program to fully implement the measure.

    Importantly, quantified reductions should not include those that would already occur because of existing regulatory requirements or other funding sources.

  • The EPA strongly encourages coalition building, though individual eligible entities are not precluded from submitting individual applications. Notably, the EPA anticipates awarding no more than two grants to applicants at the same level of government within a single jurisdiction (e.g., a single state, municipality, tribal area, or territory). In addition, the EPA will make selections to ensure diverse geographic coverage of CPRG implementation funding across the different funding tiers.

  • The State of Michigan is currently working to create avenues for folks to access support for grant writing and other technical assistance.

  • Eligible entities that are located within counties that are covered by SEMCOG’s or GVMC’s PCAP will be eligible to apply for competitive funding under either the State of Michigan PCAP, or the PCAP of the applicable regional entity.

  • Applications will be evaluated against others in the same tier, and will be evaluated using the following scoring criteria:

    Evaluation Criteria Points

    1. Overall Project Summary and Approach

    1. (20 points) Description of GHG Reduction Measures. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it:
      1. Provides a detailed description of each of the proposed GHG reduction measures to be undertaken;
      2. Describes the major features, tasks, milestones, and potential risks for each measure;
      3. In the case of a coalition application, describes the roles and responsibilities of each coalition member in the project design and implementation; and,
      4. Explains how each GHG reduction measure relates to a priority GHG reduction measure included in the relevant PCAP, why each measure was selected as a priority, and how each measure will meet the goals of the CPRG program.
    2. (10 points) Demonstration of Funding Need. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it:
      1. Demonstrates a strong need for EPA CPRG implementation funding;
      2. Explains if and how other funding streams have been explored, and why these sources are not sufficient; and,
      3. Lists federal and non-federal funding sources the applicant has applied for, has secured, and/or will secure to implement the GHG reduction measures, if applicable.
    3. (15 points) Transformative Impact. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it demonstrates that the GHG reduction measures have the potential to create transformative opportunities or impacts that can lead to significant additional GHG emissions reductions.

    45

    2. Impact of GHG Reduction Measures

    1. (20 points) Magnitude of GHG Reductions from 2025 through 2030. The application will be evaluated on the magnitude of cumulative GHG emission reductions and the durability of the reductions to be achieved by the proposed GHG reduction measures from 2025 through 2030, using appropriate methodologies and assumptions. Applications will be assessed on the estimated emission reductions that will directly result from EPA CPRG implementation grant funding.
    2. (10 points) Magnitude of GHG Reductions from 2025 through 2050. The application will be evaluated on the magnitude of cumulative GHG emission reductions and the durability of the reductions to be achieved by the proposed GHG reduction measures from 2025 through 2050, using appropriate methodologies and assumptions. Applications will be assessed on the estimated emission reductions that will directly result from EPA CPRG implementation grant funding.
    3. (15 points) Cost Effectiveness of GHG Reductions. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and the:
      1. Cost effectiveness of the GHG reduction measures in terms of the CPRG implementation grant dollars requested divided by cumulative GHG metric ton of CO2-equivalent emission reductions to be achieved from 2025 through 2030 for the set of measures in the application, and
      2. Qualitative narrative explaining any factors that may affect the cost-effectiveness calculation
    4. (15 points) Documentation of GHG Reduction Assumptions. The application will be evaluated on the quality, thoroughness, reasonableness, and comprehensiveness of the methodologies, assumptions, and calculations used for developing the estimated GHG emission reductions for the GHG reduction measures included in the application, including GHG reductions from 2025 through 2030; GHG reductions from 2025 through 2050; and, the estimated cost per metric ton of CO2-equivalent GHG reductions to be achieved from 2025 through 2030 for the collection of measures in the application.
    60

    3. Environmental Results – Outputs, Outcomes, and Performance Measures

    1. (10 points) Expected Outputs and Outcomes. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it identifies expected outputs and outcomes, as defined in Section I.C for each GHG measure, including listing GHG emission reductions and listing co-pollution (CAP and HAP) emission changes as outcomes, among others.
    2. (10 points) Performance Measures and Plan. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and the extent to which it:
      1. Provides a clear description of the proposed performance measures to track, measure, and report progress toward achieving the expected outputs and outcomes for each GHG reduction measure, and
      2. Describes the plan for effectively tracking and measuring progress in implementing each GHG reduction measure.
    3. (10 points) Authorities, Implementation Timeline, and Milestones. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it:
      1. Identifies the parties and their roles and responsibilities for implementing each GHG reduction measure;
      2. For each measure, describes whether the implementing entity has current authority to carry out the measure and if they do not, articulates the plan and timing for obtaining it during the grant period; and,
      3. Provides the detailed implementation timeline for each measure, including key milestones for specific tasks, and discusses the key actions needed to meet the project goals and objectives by the end of the grant period.
    30

    4. Low-Income and Disadvantaged Communities

    1. (25 points) Community Benefits. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it:
      1. Provides a comprehensive discussion and assessment of expected benefits and/or avoided disbenefits to low-income and disadvantaged communities from the proposed GHG reduction measures;
      2. Lists CEJST Census tract IDs or EPA’s EJScreen Census block group IDs for areas that may be affected by GHG reduction measures; and,
      3. Describes the plan to assess, quantify, and report a more thorough quantitative analysis of associated community benefits, including co-pollutant (CAP and HAP) emission reductions.
    2. (10 points) Community Engagement. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it:
      1. Explains how input from low-income and disadvantaged communities was incorporated into the application, and
      2. Describes how meaningful engagement with low-income and disadvantaged communities will be continuously included in the implementation of the GHG reduction measures.
    35

    5. Job Quality (5 points). The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it describes, as applicable, concrete strategies and commitments to ensure job quality, strong labor standards, and a diverse, highly skilled workforce for the implementation of the GHG reduction measures.

    5

    6. Programmatic Capability and Past Performance

    1. (10 points) Past Performance. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it demonstrates that the applicant has past performance in successfully managing and completing the federal assistance agreements as described in Section IV.B.
    2. (10 points) Reporting Requirements. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it:
      1. Demonstrates that the applicant has a history of meeting the reporting requirements under the assistance agreements identified in the project narrative as described in Section IV.B, and
      2. Describes whether the applicant submitted acceptable final technical reports under those agreements; the extent to which the applicant adequately and timely reported on their progress towards achieving the expected outputs and outcomes under those agreements; and, if sufficient progress was not being made, whether the applicant adequately reported the reason for insufficient progress.
    3. (10 points) Staff Expertise. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it demonstrates that the applicant has the requisite organizational experience, including staff expertise and qualifications, staff knowledge, and resources or ability of obtain them, to successfully achieve the goals of the proposed project.

    Note: In evaluating applicants under criteria 6.a and 6.b, EPA will consider the information provided by the applicant and may also consider relevant information from other sources, including agency files and prior/current grantors (e.g., to verify and/or supplement the information supplied by the applicant). If the applicant does not have any relevant or available past performance or reporting information, please indicate this in the application. The application will receive a neutral score for criteria 6.a and 6.b. A neutral score is 5 points of 10 possible points for each criterion. If the applicant does not provide any response for these items, they may receive a score of 0 for these criteria.

    30

    7. Budget and Timely Expenditure of Grant Funds

    1. (20 points) Budget Detail. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which the proposed budget provides a detailed breakout by funding type in the proper budget category for each activity for which the applicant is requesting funding.
    2. (15 points) Expenditure of Awarded Funds. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which it demonstrates that the approach, procedures, and controls described in the application will ensure that awarded grant funds will be expended in a timely and efficient manner.
    3. (10 points) Reasonableness of Cost. The application will be evaluated on the quality of the response and extent to which the proposed grant expenditures are reasonable for accomplishing the proposed goals, objectives, and measurable environmental outcomes described in the application.
    45

    Total

    250

  • Since the EPA strongly encourages coalition building when applying for these competitive funds, it is recommended that non-eligible entities serve to facilitate connections between other eligible entities and provide corresponding support to these entities where necessary. Additionally, non-eligible entities are encouraged to become engaged in the stakeholder engagement processes mentioned above to aid in the identification and scoping of PCAPs being developed by the State of Michigan, SEMCOG, and GVMC. Please sign up for the Michigan Climate Action News and Updates listserv to be notified of upcoming engagement opportunities. 

Not seeing your question? Email EGLE-OCE@michigan.gov, or check out the EPA’s webpages on the Phase I Planning Grants and the Phase II Implementation Grants for their FAQs and other resources.