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Democracy MVP

Democracy MVP

Democracy MVP

Be democracy's MVP!

Election workers are the Most Valuable Players of our democracy, ensuring free and fair elections for all. Right now, our democracy needs election workers more than ever. Election workers are paid for their service and trained before Election Day.

Sign up to be an election worker today

Frequently asked questions (FAQs)

  • In order to serve as an election worker, you must be a registered voter of the state if you are 18+. You can also apply if you are a 16- or 17-year-old resident of Michigan. You can check your voter registration status at Michigan.gov/Vote. If you are not yet registered to vote but want to apply to serve, you can register to vote online (at Michigan.gov/Vote) and then sign up.

    Additionally, you cannot be a challenger, candidate, member of a candidate's immediate family, or a member of the local board of canvassers. Anyone convicted of a felony or an election crime may not serve.

  • Yes. You will be paid at an hourly rate no lower than the minimum wage. Election workers are covered by the federal Minimum Wage Act.

  • Yes, you'll receive training if you're selected as a poll worker.

  • The Department of State or local election officials will be in touch with details on how to submit an application and receive the requisite training. Ultimately, you will need to be formally appointed by the local city/township board in order to apply.

  • If you have ever wondered how to become more active in government, there are plenty of opportunities for you that do not involve running for elected office. Michigan has 83 counties, 274 cities, and 1,242 townships. During an election, each of these units of government requires a staff of paid workers to assist voters and help process ballots.

    Election workers, also known as poll workers, precinct inspectors and election inspectors, are people who are paid to assist voters and count ballots on Election Day.

    To be an election worker, you must be a registered voter of the state. If you are not yet registered to vote but want to serve, you can register to vote online (at Michigan.gov/VoterRegistration) and then sign up. An election worker cannot be be a challenger, candidate, member of a candidate's immediate family, or a member of the local board of canvassers. Anyone convicted of a felony or an election crime may not serve.

    Interested? You can sign up today at Michigan.gov/DemocracyMVP to receive more information on the next steps. You will need to attend training(s), submit a completed election inspector application to your local clerk, and be appointed by the local city/township board. Among other things, the application will include name, address and date of birth, political party preference and qualifications to fill the position such as education or experience.

Election Inspector resources