• Bait

    Bait means a substance intended for consumption that is composed of grains, minerals (including salt and salt blocks), fruits, vegetables, hay or other food materials, which may lure, entice or attract deer or elk as an aid in hunting. 

    Feed

    Feed means a substance intended for consumption that is composed of grains, minerals (including salt and salt blocks), fruits, vegetables, hay or other food materials, which may lure, entice or attract deer or elk for any reason other than hunting.

    Baiting and Feeding Regulations

    Baiting and feeding are banned in the Lower Peninsula, and banned in the Upper Peninsula core CWD surveillance area. In areas where baiting is banned, scents placed to entice deer, whether composed of natural or synthetic materials, must be placed so that they are inaccessible for consumption by deer and placed in such a manner to prohibit any physical contact with deer. This does not apply to urine-based products bearing the Archery Trade Association (ATA) symbol on the bottle or packaging. Hunters can still use those urine-based products for mock scrapes, drag ropes, wicks, etc. 
     
    Exception: Hunters with disabilities who meet specific requirements may use single-bite baits in the above counties during the Liberty and Independence Hunts only. Eligible hunters may begin baiting for the Liberty Hunt on September 9 this year, five days prior to when the season begins.  
     
    Single-bite baits are defined as shelled corn, nuts, beet pulp, deer feed or pellets, or wheat or other grain.
    Bait volume at any hunting site cannot exceed two gallons. Bait dispersal must be over a minimum 10-foot by 10-foot area. Bait must be scattered directly on the ground. It can be scattered by any means, including mechanical spin-cast feeders, provided that the spin-cast feeder does not distribute more than the maximum volume allowed.
     
    To qualify, you must fit one of the following criteria:
    • Be a veteran who has been determined to have 100-percent disability or is rated as individually unemployable by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.
    • Have been issued a permit by the DNR to hunt from a standing vehicle.
    • Have been issued a permit by the DNR to hunt using a laser-sighting device.
    • Be blind. Blind means an individual who has visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with correction or has a limitation of his or her field of vision such that the widest diameter of the visual field subtends an angular distance not greater than 20 degrees, as determined by the Commission for the Blind.
  • In the rest the Upper Peninsula where baiting is allowed, the following baiting regulations apply:
     
    • Baiting may occur only from Sept. 15 - Jan. 1 except that eligible hunters may begin baiting for the Liberty Hunt on September 9 this year, five days prior to when the season begins.
    • Bait volume at any hunting site cannot exceed two gallons. Bait dispersal must be over a minimum 10-foot by 10-foot area.
    • Bait must be scattered directly on the ground. It can be scattered by any means, including mechanical spin-cast feeders, provided that the spin-cast feeder does not distribute more than the maximum volume allowed.
    • To minimize exposure of deer to diseases that may be present, the DNR recommends not placing bait or feed repeatedly at the same point on the ground, and only baiting when actively hunting.

    In the rest of the Upper Peninsula where feeding is allowed, the following feeding rules apply:

    • Feed volume at any residence cannot exceed two gallons.

    • Feed may be no more than 100 yards from a residence on land owned or possessed by that person.
    • Feed must be scattered on the ground. It can be scattered by any means, including mechanical spin-cast feeders, provided that the spin-cast feeder does not distribute more than the maximum volume allowed.
    • Feed must be at least 100 yards from any area accessible to cattle, goats, sheep, new world camelids, bison, swine, horses or captive cervidae.

    Food plots — Naturally occurring foods, standing agricultural crops, or food placed as a result of using normal agricultural practices are not considered to be bait or feed. Constructing or maintaining any food plot or any artificial garden to attract wildlife on public land is prohibited.