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Health Care Providers

How Providers Can Help Michigan's Children

Thank you for your support of Michigan's Hearing and Vision Screening Programs. In order to maintain funding and demonstrate the efficacy of these programs, it is essential that we receive documentation that confirms medical intervention, diagnosis, and treatment recommendations.

Parents are provided with paperwork to be completed by your office. Paperwork should be faxed to your Local Health Department's Hearing and Vision program with the child's diagnosis and treatment recommendations.

When a child is identified with a hearing or vision problem, your assistance is invaluable in referring them to the appropriate intervention specialists (Early On, Special Education and other professionals) as necessary.

Testimonial

"Hearing and Vision Program,

I am writing to you in your capacity as the Coordinator of the Hearing and Vision Program for Wayne County and in follow up to our telephone conversation of February 26, 2010 regarding my daughter Samantha."

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Michigan's Hearing and Vision Technicians

Local health department-employed technicians complete and pass a comprehensive three-week educational training with practicum.

Technicians provide objective hearing and vision screenings using State-approved equipment and protocols.

To maintain quality, all technicians are evaluated on a regular basis to ensure compliance with program policies and protocols.

At least every two years, technicians must attend a continuing education workshop hosted by the State of Michigan.

Technician Training and Quality Assurance

Hearing Program
Local Health Department technicians attend an intensive two week didactic and clinical practicum training which prepares them for all stages of the screening process for pre-school and school age children.

Quality assurance is provided for the approximately 150 Local Health Department threshold technicians through field visits and required biennial skills update workshops. In Local Health Departments, the Hearing Program Consultant also provides quality assurance.

Vision Program
The battery of vision screening tests is administered by Local Health Department staff who have been trained by Division of Family and Community at MDCH. Technicians who perform pre-school and school-age screens complete a two-week comprehensive training course, including practicums with all ages of children.

Quality assurance is provided for the approximately 200 Local Health Department school screening technicians by the MDCH vision consultants, through field visits and biennial skills update workshops provided yearly in at least two regional sites. Consultation is also provided to Vision Program Coordinators in all Local Health Departments.

Resources

Physician Resources:

Vision Screening: An Explanation to Eye Care professionals
Physician Explanation Sheet, DCH-0527
Information for Health Care Providers - brochure PDF

Hearing Laughter, Seeing Smiles Topics

circle of children
The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) facilitates the Hearing and Vision screenings provided by your Local Health Department.  All of Michigan's children receive this FREE service in public, private, and charter schools as well as in preschool programs, Head Start programs, and large childcare centers.
Home
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This State mandated program provides hearing and vision screening services FREE of charge to all Michigan children.  It is managed by MDHHS, executed by Local Health Departments, and successful in large part due to the collaboration with local preschools and schools.
About the Programs
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Vision screening of pre-school children is conducted by Local Health Department staff at least once between the ages of 3 and 5 years, and school-age children are screened in grades 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9, or in conjunction with driver training classes.
Vision Screening
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The MDHHS Hearing Screening Program supports Local Health Departments in screening children at least once between the ages of 3 and 5 years, and every other year between the ages of 5 and 10 years.  Many Local Health Departments also screen children younger than 3 using Otoacoustic Emissions (OAEs).
Hearing Screening
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Your child's hearing and vision impacts their success in school. An undiagnosed hearing problem may impact your child's ability to pay attention or follow directions. An undiagnosed vision problem may affect your child's ability to read and learn.
Parent Information
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When a child is identified with a hearing or vision problem, your assistance is invaluable in referring them to the appropriate intervention specialists (Early On, Special Education and other professionals) as necessary.
Health Care Providers
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Links to helpful information and resources. 
Links