Ending the HIV Epidemic: Michigan's Initiative

Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America logoThe Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and the Detroit Health Department are actively working together in collaboration with other public health partners and community members to develop and implement a plan for Wayne County as part of the national Ending the HIV Epidemic (EtHE) initiative.

HIV has had a significant impact on individuals in Michigan. The majority of new HIV diagnoses within the state occur in Wayne County, specifically Highland Park, Detroit, Livonia, Taylor, Westland, and Canton Township.1 In 2018, most of these new diagnoses were among individuals aged 20-29, African American residents, men who have sex with men (MSM), and heterosexual women.2

Michigan's EtHE initiative, which officially kicked off in October 2019, is one of 48 initiatives launched throughout the United States. The initiatives are being supported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the U.S. Indian Health Service (IHS), the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Office of Health and Human Services (HHS) Assistant Secretary for Health, and the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Creating Michigan's Plan

Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America. Diagnose HIV as early as possible; treat HIV quickly and effectively; Protect people at risk; and Respond quickly to clusters of new cases.The initiative seeks to develop a comprehensive plan to improve the delivery of HIV prevention and care services in order to reduce new HIV infections by at least 75 percent by 2025, and by at least 90 percent by 2030. The initiative has four objectives that have been developed to help stakeholders meet these goals:

  1. Diagnose all people with HIV as early as possible.
  2. Treat people with HIV rapidly and effectively after diagnosis, achieving sustained viral suppression.
  3. Prevent new HIV transmissions through proven interventions, such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and syringe service programs (SSPs).
  4. Respond quickly to potential increases in HIV to get needed prevention and treatment services to those who need them.

To achieve these objectives and meet the initiative's goals, MDHHS and the Detroit Health Department are:

  • Working alongside statewide HIV planning bodies, including the Michigan HIV/AIDS Council (MHAC) and the Southeastern Michigan HIV/AIDS Council (SEMHAC);
  • Establishing a community-based working group;
  • Producing an epidemiologic profile and situational analysis for the Detroit Metro Area;
  • Hosting focus groups for local providers and community members to obtain deeper insights in order to develop a more comprehensive plan; and
  • Pulling the fruits of those efforts together to draft a detailed, multi-step workplan designed to accomplish the project's goals.

The community focus groups are centered on engaging individuals from populations who are living with HIV or are at-risk for contracting HIV. The provider focus groups are centered on individuals who provide healthcare and other services to populations who are living with HIV or who are at-risk for contracting HIV.

How You Can Help

To learn more about Michigan's initiative and how you can help, contact the Prevention Intervention Unit at 517-335-8148.

 

 

 

 

References:

  1. Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, HIV & STD Surveillance & Epidemiology Section. HIV in Michigan's Detroit Metro Area: An Overview of the Epidemic During 2017. July 2018.
  2. Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, HIV & STD Surveillance & Epidemiology Section. HIV & STDs in Michigan: An Overview. July 2019.